On Old Ballpark Trivia

The old ballparks were special for many reasons: quirky corners, odd shapes dictated by various aspects as houses, streets, railroads, or whatever. On the other hand, the diamond palaces serving as an arena for the battlefield known as the national pastime were nowhere near the lavish facilities of today, although the distances within the diamond remain the same. Maybe these are some of the reasons Wrigley and Fenway remain special places, or why marks note the spot of some of the baseball shrines from the past.

Here’s a quiz about the old places. Actually two quizzes in one. For those needing a tune-up, match the ballparks to the city. Then (or otherwise) match the description or feature to the ballpark. There’s only one answer for each and all parks are used only once. Answers are found below the video, a YouTube musical slide show of some of those places of not all that long ago. Tell us how you did.

Ballparks
Baker Bowl, Braves Field, Candlestick, Coliseum, Comiskey Park, Crosley Field, Ebbetts Field, Forbes Field, Griffith Stadium, Jarry Park, League Park, Memorial Stadium, Municipal Stadium (1), Municipal Stadium (2) Polo Grounds, Shibe Park, Sportsman’s Park, Tiger Stadium (Detroit), Wrigley Field (East),Wrigley Field (West)

Cities
Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago (1), Chicago (2), Cincinnati, Cleveland (1), Cleveland (2), Detroit, Kansas City, Los Angeles (1), Los Angeles (2), New York, Montreal, Philadelphia (1), Philadelphia (2), Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, Washington

Descriptions

  1. A 40-foot high screen started at the LF foul pole (251 feet) and extended 140 feet toward center
  2. A sloping terrace in left field
  3. 483 feet to centerfield
  4. The famed exploding scoreboard
  5. The covered RF upper deck overhung the lower deck by 10 feet
  6. Its third deck behind home plate was known as the Crow’s Nest
  7. A peculiar centerfield corner with a high wall due to houses located behind it
  8. Swimming pool located just beyond the right field fence
  9. Had a mechanical pop-up rabbit to deliver baseballs to the umpire
  10. One of the few early stadiums built for football
  11. A small set of right field bleachers known as the “jury box”
  12. Before adding a 20 foot fence, the right wall was only 9 feet tall and 301 feet away
  13. Originally called Weeghman Park
  14. Deep center had a hump from an underground rail tunnel and sheep cut the grass
  15. LF 375, CF 20, RF 290 with a 40 foot fence
  16. The original dimensions of this spacious cavern: LF/RF 320, alleys 463, CF 473; but gradually shortened through the years
  17. The first concrete and steel baseball stadium
  18. Because of the short porch, the RF pavilion was covered and batters faced a high screen
  19. Morning visits to this site would sell the beauty and hide the nighttime misery
  20. Its 15 foot LF ivy-covered wall formed a straight line from the foul pole (340) to straight-away center (412); thus a 345 foot power alley

Answers Cities
Braves Field (Boston), Candlestick (San Francisco), Coliseum (Los Angeles),Comiskey Park (Chicago), Crosley Field (Cincinnati), Ebbetts Field (Brooklyn), Forbes Field (Pittsburgh), Griffith Stadium (Washington), Jarry Park (Montreal), League Park (Cleveland), Memorial Stadium (Baltimore), Municipal Stadium (Kansas City), Polo Grounds (New York), Shibe Park (Philadelphia), Sportsman’s Park (St. Louis), Tiger Stadium (Detroit), Wrigley Field (East) Chicago, Wrigley Field (West) Los Angeles

Answers Descriptions

  1. A 40-foot high screen started at the LF foul pole (251 feet) and extended 140 feet toward center (Coliseum)
  2. A sloping terrace in left field (Crosley Field)
  3. 483 feet to centerfield (Polo Grounds)
  4. The famed exploding scoreboard (Comiskey Park)
  5. The covered RF upper deck overhung the lower deck by 10 feet (Tiger Stadium)
  6. Its third deck behind home plate was known as the Crow’s Nest (Forbes Field)
  7. A peculiar centerfield corner with a high wall due to houses located behind it (Griffith Stadium)
  8. Swimming pool located just beyond the right field fence (Jarry Park)
  9. Had a mechanical pop-up rabbit to deliver baseballs to the umpire (Municipal Stadium-Kansas City)
  10. One of the few early stadiums actually built for football (Memorial Stadium)
  11. A small set of right field bleachers known as the “jury box” (Braves Field)
  12. Before adding a 20-foot fence, the right wall was only 9 feet tall and 301 feet away (Ebbetts Field)
  13. Originally called Weeghman Park (Wrigley Field Chicago)
  14. Deep center had a hump from an underground rail tunnel and sheep cut the grass (Baker Bowl)
  15. LF 375, CF 420, RF 290 with a 40-foot fence (League Park)
  16. The original dimensions of this spacious cavern: LF/RF 320, alleys 463, CF 473; but gradually shortened through the years (Municipal Stadium-Cleveland)
  17. The first concrete and steel baseball stadium (Shibe Park)
  18. Because of the short porch, the RF pavilion was covered and batters faced a high screen (Sportsman’s Park)
  19. Morning visits to this site would sell the beauty and hide the nighttime misery (Candlestick)
  20. Its 15 foot LF ivy-covered wall formed a straight line from the foul pole (340) to straight-away center (412); thus a 345 foot power alley (Wrigley Field-Los Angeles)

Note
A good resource: Ballparks.com; note the navigation links on the left side. http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/index.htm

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2 thoughts on “On Old Ballpark Trivia

  1. I got 7 of the stadiums right, for some reason I thought Memorial Stadium was in Montreal. Great quiz Frank.

    I said the same thing when I first visited Yankee Stadium: http://www.daddysports.net/2009/06/in-game-experience.html.

    The newer Stadiums offer a great experience, but they are lacking the charm and excitement that comes with older Parks. You can get gourmet food, designer shirts and even watch replays on a 100 foot screen, but all of this makes the game feel like a secondary attraction. I hope Wrigley and Fenway never come down. I miss the old Yankee Stadium already with it’s narrow walkways, old bathrooms, cramped seating, noisy #4 train right behind the bleachers, and rabid fans loving every minute of it.

    Great post Frank

    • Rad,
      As you discovered, the quiz wasn’t meant to be easy! Glad you enjoyed it.

      Great comment about comparing the old parks to the newer ones. Most of the multi-purpose stadiums of the 70s are gone … thus a shelf life of 30-35 years. Since it was shorter than its forerunners, I gotta wonder how long it will take for these new ones to be ruled as “outdated.”

      Thanks for the comment.

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