On a Quantum Thought

Many of us had a traditional/classical physics course in high school. In not, you received an introduction in a physical science class. Today though, we must lightly differentiate classical physics and quantum physics.

While the foundations for classical physics are more than 500 years old, the formations of quantum physics dates back to the early 1900s. By the 1920s, the work by famous names as Max Born, Neils Bohr, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Max Planck, and others began to bring quantum physics into the main stream. Today, quantum physicists led advanced developments and a deeper understanding in physics.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle examines the limits of accuracy in the interactions between matter and energy – or as I have like to think, an explanation of the certainty of uncertainty and how uncertainty is definitely certain.

Because I’m not a physicist, there are several purposes of this post. First, in my studies of the intersection of religion and science, authors frequently used quantum physics in various explanations. Interestingly, several theologians specializing in this subject are also physicists.

Secondly, I share an interest about the intersection with Nancy, the author at Conversation in Faith as she wrote, not so long ago, this worthwhile post about Physics and Faith.

Lastly, I have featured Symphony in Science on more than one occasion – and one of the more recent ones is about quantum physics. Enjoy the learning experience to music.