On Waltz

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Did you hear the 1-2-3 pattern in the beat?

The waltz is a fun, elegant dance, but the truth be known, it is not easy

Waltz music is in 3/4 time (three beats per measure), whereas most dances are in 4/4 time

Waltz music should provide an easy to hear 1-2-3, 1-2-3 pattern, with the first beat heavier (more pronounced than the others)

In many steps, dancers elongate the second beat

Today, waltz is associated with flowing gowns, tails, and sophistication, but its roots are as a dance of 16th century peasants in eastern Europe

Here’s a chance to learn the basic step

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The word waltz is from the old German word walzen, meaning to roll, to turn, or to glide

Waltz became fashionable in Vienna in the 1780s

As the dance spread across Europe, religious leaders vehemently opposed the dance, thus proclaimed it as vulgar and sinful

Acceptance in England was even slower, but opposition waned because Queen Victoria was a good dancer and enjoyed waltz

Waltz received a big boost when Austrian composer Johann Strauss wrote numerous waltzes

Waltz first came to America in the early 1800s, yet it also received religious opposition – but to no avail as society accepted waltz by the 1850s

Here’s one of our favorite waltz songs, Come Away With Me by Norah Jones with Jonathan and Anna on DWTS (listen for the 1-2-3 beat)

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In dancehall settings, waltz moves counter-clockwise around the floor with a rise on the second beat

Waltz looks best with long, controlled strides to move the floor

Social dancing is not choreographed – it’s lead and follow … yep, the male leads and the female follows …. Ladies, would any of you have a problem with that?

Today there are two prominent styles: International Standard Waltz and American Style Waltz

Major difference is that in international style, the dancers always stay in closed position (in hold), while American style breaks hold for spins, turns, and other steps (This was very evident to me on my trip to Italy early this year)

Viennese waltz (shown later) is also in 3/4 time, but at a much faster tempo with a lot of turning (thus I don’t do Viennese because of motion sickness)

Other styles include Scandinavian, Peruvian, Mexican, Cajun, Tango vals, Venezuelan, Contra/Freeform, Valse Musette, and Cross-Step

The next set of videos are to some of my favorite waltz music – Enjoy!

Still Me (American style)

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Theme from Cider House Rules (International style)

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She Dances by Josh Grobin with Tony and Julianne on DWTS

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Nocturne by Secret Garden

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Here’s a beautiful Viennese Waltz, which is much faster, but the 1-2-3 beat is still prevalent

On Satire Bits: Vol. 66

How’s your week going? A few days of fabulous weather has blessed Cincinnati, so golf was wonderful tonight. If was cloudy, comfortable temps, played with good people, and I played very well.

Otherwise, I’ve been keeping busy enough to cut into my blog visits. 😦 Plus, we received notification that handbell rehearsals start in 3 weeks!

On to your mid-week dose of satire. I’m breaking tradition this week as these are not from The Onion. Well, I wrote these about readers here. Do you know any of these bloggers? Are you one of the ten? Go ahead, make your guesses, but I will return later with the answers in a comment.

Have a good rest of the week.

1) Local Promotes Establishing Peaceful Zones on LA Rush-Hour Freeway

2) Northern Virginia Blogger Warns Against Washington Becoming Political

3) Canadian Proclaims All Trademarks, Patents, and Copyrights Throughout the World are His upon Request

4) New NYC Tour Operator Creates Giving the Finger Tour

5) Photographer Revealed to be Alien Squirrel

6) Artist Admit to Psych Ward for Producing Drawing without Breasts, Faces, or Sexual Innuendos

7) Blogger Wins World Chortling Championship

8) Stunt Enthusiast Preparing to Surf Mudslide

9) NYC Tree Decorator Uses Bag Lady as Ornament

10) Flash in Pan – not genetics or coloring – Changes Hair to Red

On Time: The Musical – Act 5

TTime The Musicalhe Story
Time – The Musical is an original A Frank Angle production featuring songs about time.

Program (Past posts)
Act 1: Time
Act 2: Specific Time
Act 3: Years
Act 4: Months

Act 5
Act 5 only features songs with Day, Days, or any weekday (Monday through Friday) in the song title; but the challenge for attendees is no duplicates. Well, outside of the extra challenge of avoiding weekends, Saturday, and Sunday.

Production Note
It has come to my attention that past acts have crashed browsers. Please 1) include the song title and artist in your text, and 2) paste the URL as part of your last line. The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video. I will try to establish a pattern to follow in the first few comments, plus adjust when necessary.

Opening Act
Ladies and gentlemen, to kickoff Act 5, a grand AFA welcome to a group more than worthy of being in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame but is somehow omitted, it’s the Moody Blues with Tuesday Afternoon.

On Dolittle Monday

How was your weekend? Come on now, tell us something.

This weekend wasn’t our normal fare as we had family visiting; therefore no dance floor time for us. Saturday’s rain continues to keep us over the average for July and for the year. That’s OK because at least the weather wasn’t stifling! Plus, Sunday’s weather was one of those days I could take everyday.

If all goes as planned, Time: The Musical continues on the next post featuring song titles with Day, Days, or a weekday (Monday through Friday). Get your song titles and videos ready, and have a backup because no duplicates.

This week is has numerous celebratory opportunities. Monday is Lasagna Day and Tuesday is Chicken Wing Day and Paperback Book Day. Wednesday is Uncommon (Musical) Instruments Awareness Day, plus, White Lady in the Hood will welcome anyone willing to cheer the start of Fancy Rat and Mouse Week – so make a note to visit her on Wednesday for a celebratory greeting!

August starts on Thursday, which provides starts month-long culinary celebrations for celery, fennel, cactus, goat cheese, catfish, panini, orange, and papaya.

To jump-start your week, here are some funny talking animals – kind of the opposite of Dr. Dolittle. Have a good week!

On the First Sex Symbol


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Regarded as an animated sex symbol from the Depression era as she was a Flapper Girl reminder of the Roaring 20s

The wind blew up her skirt before Marilyn Monroe’s famous skirt scene

122 cartoon appearances

#17 TV Guide’s Greatest Cartoon Characters

Famous Tagline: “Boop-oop-a-doop”
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Created by Max Fleischer and Grim Natwick

First appearance Dizzy Dishes (August 9, 1930)

Last appearance Rhythm on the Reservation (July 7, 1939)

First voiced by Margie Hines, but voiced by four others in that decade

Most famously voiced by Mae Questel, who also voiced Betty in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and other appearances until her death (1998)

Fleishcer used jazz great Cab Calloway and his Minnie the Moocher hit in a 1932 short – so, here’s Calloway’s introduction and the song from the cartoon.

Originally appeared in the sixth Talkartoon series

Comic strip from 1934 to 1937

Initially appeared as a poodle in human form

Appeared many times as companion to Bimbo

Character based on Clara Bow and Helen Kane (the latter eventually sued, but lost)

Originally black and white, but the first color appearance was Poor Cinderella (1934)

Betty Boop had international popularity

Here’s a well done 4-minute report about Betty’s history

Given her dress and cleavage, the National Legion of Decency and the Production Code of 1934 forced changes in her appearance, dress, and cartoon content

Fearless Fred, a boyfriend, introduced in 1935 and her dog Pudgy

Bette Boop balloon has appeared in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Each year, a Betty Boop and Baby Boop Look-a-Like Contest is held in Montebello, California (last one was July 20, 2013)

Enjoy Riding the Rails (1938), her only Oscar nomination