On the Blogging Blues

Not long ago I read Vanessa Chapman’s post about bloggers losing their mojo. Our short interaction got me thinking because the Blogging Blues are real!

Regulars here know that I’ve been blogging about 6 ½ years (an anomaly) – and the archival record shows I’ve been fairly regular. There are times when personal, family, medical, or work issues take a blogger away from their normal routine, but as a whole, I’ve been a faithful steward of my little corner of the world.

Nonetheless, the Blogging Blues are real … and I know I’m not immune to them!

One can trace some symptoms of the Blogging Blues back to this question: Why do you blog? The collective reasons are many, but only the host blogger can answer this important question, and they must answer for themselves. Maybe – just maybe, the cure for the Blogging Blues lies in the answer to that question.

Image and Logo Property of Word Press

Image and Logo Property of Word Press

I enjoy sharing and interacting with others. Given the type of posts I do, I obviously also enjoy researching. My eclectic nature helps me to avoid ruts. I see this blog as a weekly magazine that releases one article per day, then the patterns repeats the next week. However, the Blogging Blues are real … and I am not immune from them! Can you say that to yourself? Come on … try it.

Publishing frequency can factor into the Blogging Blues. Each blogger faces the frequency question differently – and that’s OK. Schedules are a double-edged sword because while providing a rhythm, it can also be a burden on the blogger – a heavy burden of obligation leading to a self-imposed pressure – thus easily leading to a case of the Blogging Blues.

The solution is easy to say, but for some bloggers, hard to do. It took me several years to overcome this pressure, but I’ve learned not to force a post. It’s OK to miss a post. Repeat after me – It’s OK to miss a post.

Because of my posting frequency, I had to streamline my approach in order to relieve blogging pressure. That is, if I wanted to continue a certain pattern, I had to streamline my approach into something manageable at the blog end while balancing my blogging life and my life outside of blogs. Monday Morning Entertainment, Satire Bits, and Opinions in the Shorts are examples of posts requiring less effort than a deeper topic. Even with this approach, I maintain that it’s OK to miss a post.

I’ve also learned to reduce on my posting schedule when necessary. Although my posting goal is 6 per week, if I have to reduce to 2 or 3 per week, I’ve learned that it is OK – so I tell the regular readers because they appreciate knowing.

Although I like to say, Life gets in the way of blogging, in reality, periods exist when life outside of blogging demands more time. For that, I offer these suggestions:

  • Tell your community that you won’t be posting because of whatever
  • Give yourself a blogging break

Say this loud – Blogging breaks are good. Say it again, but this time with some gusto – Blogging breaks are good!

Blogging breaks are times away from your blog. They can be planned or unplanned, and for many possible reasons, including giving yourself time for whatever.

To me, there are four levels of blogging breaks.

  • Level 1: Complete removal of yourself from blogging for a designated time period. No posting, no writing, no visiting … nada, zilch, absolutely nothing. Stay away and don’t worry about it. But as BloggingBreakspreviously stated, tell your community about your upcoming absence.
  • Level 2: Similar to Level 1 because you have no online presence. However, you spend your time preparing posts.
  • Level 3: No posting, but you spend time visiting and commenting on other blogs. This keeps you connected, provides time to reconnect with old friends, and make new connections – and this may be a re-energizing experience and even spark an idea or two for your future posts.
  • Level 4: Similar to Level 3 because of your online absence, but you are drafting future posts. After all, writing is a process and some of us like to have drafts in the queue. Meanwhile, you are still in contact with your community and potentially expanding it.

Regardless of the level, blogging breaks are good, and bloggers should use them as a way of preventing the Blogging Blues. As a matter of fact, a calendar year should include multiple breaks at different levels.

Here are some of my secrets to blogging longevity.

  • Focus on your community over stats
  • Support your community, including reciprocating
  • Interact with those who comment on your blog, and comment elsewhere
  • Be true to yourself and to your community
  • Communicate with your community
  • Don’t force yourself into posting
  • Discover a blogging balance
  • Take the appropriate blogging break multiple times a year

None of us are immune to the Blogging Blues because they are real. Do you have any suggestions for the Blogging Blues?

Let’s close with something for music lovers … that is, a touch of the blues that may make you smile … but I’m not the breeze. Enjoy.

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145 thoughts on “On the Blogging Blues

  1. Interesting timing of this post, Frank! I’m taking the month of May off. This is my first break in a few years. I have a lot going on right now outside the blogosphere. I don’t like to write half-ass posts or comments. Because I strive to write whole-ass, I’ve announced on my site that I’m taking May off.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Great music playing while I type this – two of my favourites!

    Great post Frank – your longevity and regularity are inspirations!

    I sometimes find myself feeling a bit apathetic about writing a post – I have no regularity because of this, never have had and probably never will have – even when I kid myself by saying something like, ‘Let’s write a post every week this month Pauline….’ then I don’t. 🙂 I get busy with other things…. But I rarely miss reading posts – even when I don’t comment. [Except for this past month when life got way out of hand!] I think I keep blogging now for my readers. I love my blogging community and consider it as valid a part of my life as the real, physical one I can see and touch. As in any community people come and people go. Some are closer than others, some stay around longer than others, some make a deep impression and are gone. The blues also come and go – It’s like real life isn’t it?

    Of course the reasons why we blog change constantly – as one of my friends has written ‘I came for the writing and stayed for the friendship.’ And as my recent experiences attest, one can have no idea what might happen when we start blogging! I think I would think twice before stopping blogging altogether – but taking breaks can be a necessary part of life – real or virtual!

    Like

    • Pauline,
      Many great points here, so thanks for sharing!!!

      Non-regular posting is fine … and once a community is built, they will appear. Interestingly, in terms of blogger pressure, the host puts the pressure on themselves, yet the readers are the most understanding.

      Love your emphasis on community because i feel that way … and having one is very special.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I rarely miss a post through a lack of subjects. I tend to miss due to being gone or being too tired to post. If I do not post a chapter of a story, I post thoughts, poetry, or reviews (which I need desperately to get back to). But I do empathize with those who do run out of things to say, whether due to writer’s block or just simply losing train of thought.

    Like

    • Jay,
      Great points. I see you have a way to streamline your posting when necessary … well done! And for the true writers out there, whew … writer’s block is real! Thanks for sharing and cheers to your persistence.

      Like

  4. When I take breaks, I usually still visit other blogs, at least once or twice a week. I only post weekly or every other week so I don’t get too burnt out from posting. Where I have trouble is keeping up with all the posts of the bloggers I follow. I inevitably miss some, but that’s life, I guess. I like to think I’m there in spirit. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I admit to being a tad nonchalant about the whole blogging business. It’s a go-with-the-flow type of blog, that I write. I’m not good with schedules but I am GREAT at commenting on others’ blogs (right? 😉 ) and responding to all that take the time to leave me a comment.

    I’d like to be a tad more organized but, well, that’s just not moi. I probably “coulda been a contender” were I not so lazy but so it is. I yam what I yam!

    Love you, though Frank! Thankful to our common friend, Jots for introducing us, so to speak!

    Like

    • Dale,
      An irregular posting schedule is fine … and there are some you do it very well, so there’s no reason to criticize yourself for that.

      The way you interact elsewhere is an important trademark, so when you do post, people want to come!

      Meanwhile, many thanks for the kind words and for making me smile as often as you do. BTW … a WP gnome from the dark side changed a setting that stopped me from receiving emails about new posts … thus a reason why you haven’t me.

      Speaking of RRR … how is the Rose Queen doing?

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This was so helpful and typical of your generous spirit. I can’t get over the blogging break steps you’ve detailed! I hope you don’t have the blues – now I’m worried about you. But I’ll try to cheer you up if you do 🙂

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    • Kelly,
      Although I’m not immune to the Blogging Blues, I don’t feel that I have them at the present time. As I mentioned, this post actually started with a comment on Vanessa’s post. Right now I feel very behind on reading and commenting elsewhere, so my question is do I take a break from posting just to reconnect outside? (An odd thing happened in my settings that has happened before. … will have a brief statement in the next post about you haven’t seen me at your end.)

      As for the breaks, just remember that Blogging breaks are good. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Frank! I’ve been having “technical issues” as well. Seems to be going around right now. I agree that there are many feelings including pressure related to blogging. I haven’t been involved in it long enough to feel like I need a break, but can definitely respect the fact that breaks are good! I need breaks now and then from just about everything! Thanks again for such a helpful, informative post – it really helped someone like me who is just diving in, and sometimes feels like they need a lifeline 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. As for the blogging blues, what can I contribute that you have not already addressed. Having departed from blogging before Christmas, I maintain a facsimile, as I go about doing other things. Am not sure I ever was a blogger per say; not being all that biographical. I probably shot myself in the foot. And yes I plan on coming back to it, just not for some time soon.

    Like

    • Calvin,
      Oh yes … you are a blogger because bloggers come in many forms. After all, one size doesn’t fit all.

      Sure the blogging blues are real, but there is no way that I covered all aspects of it … heck, many comments here included great points that I didn’t include. Then again, that goes back to one size not fitting all.

      To me, you are off-the-charts creative!

      Like

  8. Frank, I’ve always admired your posting schedule. I just do what I can. At the moment it feels like I’m limping along. I think it’s totally normal to have the blogging blues and it’s good to take a break completely once in a while. Thanks for all your insights, coming from such a seasoned pro like yourself. I appreciate it.

    Like

    • Amy,
      You recently had a break for an important personal/family issue. The mere fact that you told us was wonderful … which also put you on our minds, thus causing your readers to wonder about how you are doing. So don’t force yourself!

      Believe me, I’ve questioned my posting schedule more than once …. many times wondering WHY! Nonetheless, glad you found something useful in this post.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I understand blogging blues. I don’t post as regularly as you do, but I do feel a strange compulsion to post. I have learned to be a bit more relaxed about it and it I don’t feel like writing a post, I don’t. Sometimes I like to have a few prepared ahead, but lately I have just been to busy.
    The best thing about blogging is the friends you make.

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    • Debra,
      You may not post daily, but I know you have at least 2 blogs … and I wonder how and the heck you do it! After all, you get good traffic on both of them. … thus I applaud your efforts as well as your understanding of the blogging blues. … and cheers to the community we cherish … and I look forward to us clinking glasses in Bagni!

      Like

      • I have a third blog called Beautiful Helsinki, which almost nobody reads. I love Helsinki and Finland and will continue with it as long as I find things to write about. I go to Helsinki 4 times a year and gather up stories to post throughout the year.

        Like

  10. Thanks for the link back Frank! I’m not sure about blogging breaks for myself, generally if I stop doing something I find it much harder to get back to it, so I prefer to kind of ride out the blues which is why I was lamenting a bit that time, resisting taking an actual break for fear of not coming back. But then because I’m a much less active blogger than you, I guess I have breaks from it every week. I also know that I would more likely burn out if I forced myself into a schedule with it, the random approach tends to work overall for me!

    Like

    • Vanessa,
      Knowing yourself is a great point in the equation that you have brought up that I didn’t. Simply excellent! In terms of blogging breaks, I like the fact of the four level because in three of them, the breaks are only breaks from posting, thus one is still engaged with their blog in some way. Cheers to your persistence to being able to ride out the blogging blues … and thanks for your role in initiating this post.

      Like

  11. I keep pumping out two or three posts a week, but so many of the sites I used to read every day are now closed down completely, or temporarily, but long term, that I think I got a case of Blogging Blues. It’s been so long since I’ve been here, some guy at the door asked for ID. 🙄

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    • Archon,
      Good aspect about the Blogging Blues from a different perspective. Yes … I too miss the personalities that were once regular visitors on these pages … and probably a reason why I gave them a section on my BlogRoll page. …. and with a sense of sadness.

      Like

  12. Been there, done that … and somehow when one returns all the same faces are still there and even new ones suddenly appear to say how they missed you… great post Frank…

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  13. I believe there’s exactly ONE reason why we blog. Not a collection of reasons. We blog because we need the eggs. We need the attention. We need the interaction. We need the dopamine when a comment arrives.

    Need, need, need. Same for everyone.

    Not only is it okay to miss a post, it’s preferable. Quality vs. quantity. I’m down to +/- one every six days and my writing has never been better. I’ve gotten a bigger audience because of it, as well. Don’t fear the spaces between. You’re not going to lose anyone.

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    • Mark,
      “Not losing anyone” is a wonderful point and I completely agree. Bloggers are a faithful lot, so they will be there.

      After I got my tablet several years ago, I was playing with a mindmap app … actually created two maps about blogging: Why and Who. For whatever reason, the app stopped working, thus I lost the maps. … and yes, from what I recall, it came down to the need for the eggs … and probably the underlying reason why I post as frequently as I do … of course now you have me questioning it. 🙂

      Like

      • Don’t start questioning yourself! Especially because of a comment from a dope like me! We all have different artistic needs. If you’ve got so much bottled up inside you that it requires a daily post, then so be it. Don’t change with an eye towards outward appearances. You can’t please everyone so you’ve got to please yourself. [See what I did there?]

        Like

  14. Great timing, Frank. I’m taking a break soon. I’ve been blogging forever (since 1999, in various formats and on various blogs), and for the first time in forever, I’ve been thinking about giving it up completely. I’m sure a break will help me change my mind. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Robin,
      Wow … I didn’t realize you were a blogging pioneer! Loud & many cheers for your persistence, longevity, and quality!

      Stepping away for a blogging break is healthy. If you noticed, I didn’t say anything about the time required … so take the time that you need!

      Like

  15. Hi Frank,
    I figured out a while back, that the way to enjoying blogging and longevity was to reduce my posting frequency – so now I only post once a week on Fridays for the Weekly Photo Challenge. It still keeps me in the blogosphere but gives me time for all of the other things I like to do. I also visit and comment almost every day, but on really busy days, I give myself permission to delete the notification emails.

    Great post!

    Cathy

    Like

  16. A MOST important and well-articulated post, Frank. When I started a M-F photoblog 4-1/2 years ago, I was glad that I made it a WEEKDAY blog, because it gave me the weekends to take more photos (I was working a 40-hr./week job then), and to pre-schedule all my posts for the coming week. When I realized that the blog was becoming a drudgery, I took the month of August off last year to recharge my creative batteries. It was the best thing I could have done, because I started back up again with renewed enthusiasm.

    At the time, I decided that I would take EVERY August off, but I might not this year. It’s getting harder and harder for me to come up with photos, captions, and titles for every weekday post (after over 1,000 posts), and I’m seriously thinking about ending the blog on the 5th anniversary of it’s launch (Nov. 1). If that’s what I decide, you heard it here first.

    Like

    • John,
      I know how much you post, plus I realize that coming up with captions for the photos must be an ongoing challenge. Interestingly, the amount of pertinent object you could photograph is endless, but it’s just not that simple.

      I recall your month-long break, and yes … very much needed. Meanwhile, you (and only you) will know when the time comes to close up the shop. Then again, maybe posting M-W-F may be an alternative. Another idea … you post once a week here … that is as part of my weekly magazine. After all, that is an option.

      Like

  17. It’s a good question: what motivates blogging? I think it’s a little different for different people, but the answer at its core must be that we are social creatures and enjoy social contact. For me, I have a curiosity about what others find meaningful in life and I’m still finding an occasional surprise. I blogged for about 4 years but haven’t posted now for months. I felt the need to opine on subjects that interest me and sample the reactions of others, and now I feel that I’ve run the gamut of those. But, the need for meaningful contact remains and visiting a few thoughtfully-tended blogs like yours, Frank, is filling that need. I especially like your talent for finding “good reads”. You have so many followers, though, that the wheat (meaningful comment) tends to be buried in the chaff.

    Your idea of taking a break is a good one, I think. Reflection and meditation are good for the soul. You are a most energetic guy – I wish you many more years of productive blogging.

    Jim

    Like

    • Jim,
      You’ve shared many good points in your comment … well done.

      I’m right with you about the need for social interaction. After all, that’s part of being human … and I know that blogging has been a social tool for some who can’t get out (or at least limited) … and I think that’s great.

      Humans are also creatures for learning, which you’ve mentioned. Thus my enjoyment with researching posts about content … although I can’t always doing them because (as you know) it’s time consuming. … which is one reason I include the Interesting Reads on Fridays.

      In blogging, no way does one size fit all … thus the combination of this post and the comments has turned into an outstanding collection.

      Like

  18. Very interesting and very good analysis. I must admit to never have had the Blogging Blues (yet) although hat doesn’t mean that I prepare a new blog every day. Far from it. The wordpress scheduling is very useful.
    I have found blogging reflects life really in that there are people you meet in the blogsphere who become long term friends, some who stick around for a while then lose interest and disappear for no reason and a few who burst on to the scene, make a big impact and are never heard of again. You know what I mean, whatever happened to whats his name? 🙂

    Like

    • Fasab,
      There are so many good points in the comments, and glad that you’ve added yours. To me, more good points in the comments that in my post – so a wonderful bit of information as a collective.

      Then again, blogging is like a collective, and I am fortunate to be in the midst of a wonderful community.

      Like I, you post a lot … and like I, you have a schedule that you post around, thus similar to my description of how I think of this blog as a weekly magazine.

      People coming and going is part of the deal. Sad, but true, we miss people … those who simply no longer stop by, only do so on occasion, stop blogging, or even die. That’s why I group the BlogRoll page the way I did.

      Thanks for contributing!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Another great post Frank – I like you analyzed process of taking a break!! I agree whole- hearted as I took the month of December off from blogging and really was a wonderful break. I still struggle with the many posts that hit my reader every day – going through all and commenting, take an incredible amount of time and energy. I’m to a point where I might go back one or two days, but once my reader gets packed with more, I’ll have to just let them go and let my followers know – because it does interfere with my regular life. I’ve learned to unfollow photographer bloggers who post multiple photographs in a day – they are on a special list that I go into once a week and hit all their posts. Only way that I’ve found to manage this. You, btw, do very well at managing all aspects of blogging.

    Like

    • Mary,
      I remember when your December break, so thanks for sharing the benefits of doing so. You’ve added many good points, and the bottom line is that there are only so many hours in a day … and we have to balance our life and blogging … and it may be done in multiple ways and is different for each of us. As I’ve stated in other comments, one size doesn’t fit all in blogging.

      Thanks for the kind words. I manage my little corner of the world well … but I’m up in down on visiting others … which is important to me and my blogging philosophy. Sometimes I take a break from posting just to visit!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I read your blog just about everyday and value it for its intellectual scope, professional writing, and entertaining variety. Keep up the great work and no problem from me when you rest. It makes me feel good that you’re recharging your batteries in order to come back all the stronger to share your eclectic interests and opinions with those of us who are limping along, “trying to find the answers to life’s persistent questions.”

    Like

    • Tim,
      Thanks for your ongoing support. Interestingly, I didn’t write this for myself as my target audience was others. As it can happen, the comments stimulated thinking within me … I guess what goes around comes around.Thanks again.

      Like

  21. I don’t post as often as I used to and have been reading less…not sure why that is. I post less only because I find I am void of interesting topics to write about…maybe if I read more blogs, I could fix that problem. I think I just came up with my own answer…ugh. Thanks, Frank!

    Like

    • Kayjai,
      Thanks for sharing your story because it is important. After all, there are others who feel (or have felt) the same. Walking away is different from a blogging break, whose full intention involves returning.

      What started one of the Blogging Break levels – specifically Level 3 … and as you do that, transitioning to Level 4 is a distinct possibility.

      Bottom line is simple, I hope something in this post or in the comments from others helps you.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I’ve been at this for four years now–6 1/2–WOW! And I though I was an old timer! Your emphasis on the community over stats is so right. If not for the connection, I wouldn’t be able to keep this up. And I make new friends all the time. 🙂

    Like

  23. Blogging breaks are most certainly good. And I believe it’s good to have a schedule that works for you. To many bloggers want to follow other bloggers lead on things and really, they need to find what works for them. You don’t have to blog everyday it it’s to much, find your own rhythm. I really think that’s one main problem with some bloggers. They want to copy someone elses regime without creating there own.

    And some new bloggers start a site for the wrong reasons. Like wanting to make money or wanting fame. Start a blog because you want to start one, not for fame or money. First you have to have a presence and something interesting to say before any type of fame can even come to you. Okay I went to long and off subject Frank lol… sorry. But I really do feel this. I hope to see you at my new blog next week.

    Like

    • Kay,
      Oh no … you aren’t off the subject at all because I think all aspects are linked. The number of bloggers who follow and then never return is very high. Heck, I visit them, make a comment, and most of the time get nothing more than Thank you.

      I like what you said about finding one’s own rhythm because to me rhythm is the posting frequency and the blog’s theme (and I don’t mean layout theme). Many thanks for adding your wonderful perspective! …. and I anxiously await next week.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. There definitely is something called the blogging blues. I think a chief cause is the “too muchness” factor. Somewhere we get the idea that blogging every day and having hundreds–nay thousands- of followers is virtuous. If quality and community are important, then we need reciprocity. Some don’t seem to realize that it’s a two-way street—you post, but you also read and comment. My own blog, since it’s pretty much restricted to an interest that is not universal, ends up being about the right size and pace for me. It has found me several really important friends, as well as interesting acquaintances around the world.

    Like

    • Cynthia,
      As with many others here, great comments. Heck, someone could make a post or more just out of the comments here about the Blogging Blues.

      To me, like yourself, reciprocity is extremely important. In my case, it’s my worst enemy (given my posting routine) … and that’s all on me. … To me, I think more than some don’t understand that.Thanks for sharing!

      Like

  25. Sometimes you have to renegotiate your life and put things like blogging on the back burner for a bit. Having to physically attend college this year has completely changed my modus operandi. I have a lot of “homework” to do and as the content of this course is exciting, but something WAY outside my comfort zone, I find that I am having to concentrate incredibly hard just to keep up. Something had to give and it was blogging and responding to comments on a regular basis. I have 177 blogs in my RSS Feed Reader. Most of them I don’t comment on but I have a select (and reasonably large) collective of blogs that I comment on regularly, so much so, that it takes me 2 hours in the morning to do so. I get up at 3am and suddenly, with all of the added workload, answering comments had lost its allure. I needed to find some time to fit other things into and my early morning time started to get eaten away. I will be back, just not entirely sure when. I am still here though 😉

    Like

    • Narf,
      Given your classes and estate that you tend, I’m amazed that you find time to touch base with bloggers. A toast to you for your efforts. Then again, everyone needs some getaway time.

      Meanwhile, you are absolute correct about moving something (blogging in this case) to the back burner to meet life’s demands. It simply happens and for all kind of reasons.

      Liked by 1 person

      • We finally nailed down our lecturer to give us a hand to upload our new blogs onto our own server so the new blog should be up and running soon. I haven’t had much impetus to blog as my old (free WordPress) blog is almost full and I didn’t want to cause any problems with a smooth transition from old to new. I have enjoyed not having so many deadlines and am really enjoying this new course but it certainly took all of that delicious spare time I wallowed in last year and made it a delicious memory 😉

        Like

        • Looking forward to visiting the new digs. Oh yes …. your spare time is (and has been) limited, but you’re doing something you want to do. After all, much of life is a give-and-take process, thus, one can’t have everything all the time.

          Liked by 1 person

        • One can rarely have everything all of the time but one can choose what is most important on a daily basis. Each day has it’s own degree of importance.

          Like

  26. Great advice. I found a rhythm in having an event for each day. This keeps the blog fresh for me and the amount of angst down to a dull roar. I never have to sit and wonder what I’m going to write. The schedule dictates.

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  27. I enjoyed my few days off when the family were here. I think the type of content which you blog must be very time consuming indeed, Frank. I really don’t know how you keep up. I have also told myself that it’s okay to miss days. It’s a hobby, not a career. 😀

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  28. With summer arriving shortly and people having so much to do and enjoy away from the screens, this is a timely post. Well written. And I agree chatting with people beats counting stats.
    I think people have to find their own flow and rhythm about posting – and reading/commenting. Some days you just want to do one or the other. It all should be fun and without stress ( but we all feel pressure as we all seem to have high expectations for ourselves?)
    Floating free is good…the stream is always there when you’re ready to get back in the swim.

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  29. It’s interesting to read your thoughts on this subject. I feel torn about the ratio of posting to spending time on other blogs. I have had to cut way back on my own posting in order to have the time to read and stay connected. I have a very limited bit of available time, and I just do the best I can, and when it’s not enough I just have to grit my teeth and accept it! I honestly didn’t know what I was doing when i started the blog. I really didn’t. Had I understood the time element I’m confident I wouldn’t have started blogging. Even with this realization, I’m still very glad I started. I write all day at work, so sometimes I do come home with good intentions and just cannot bear to turn on the computer. Those aren’t planned, they just happen. 🙂

    Like

    • Debra,
      Our stories parallel because I didn’t know what I was doing, how to get visitors, the time required, etc. Oddly enough, at the start I didn’t post almost daily … not sure how I evolved into that. Still not sure if that’s a good idea. Meanwhile, don’t you hate it when life gets in the way of blogging! 😉 Thanks for sharing.

      Like

  30. Great post! Frank. Good advice from a seasoned blogger. I pretty much adhere to number three. I like your comparison to blogging being like a magazine. That’s how I look at it as a reader. I’m a terrible blogger but a good reader. I love my blogging peeps ( which include you)

    Like

    • Audra,
      As you know, blogs came in many flavors … more than Baskin-Robbins or Ben & Jerry’s ever imagined … and that only’s content, let alone frequency. But I’m won’t allow you to be negative on yourself because I like what you do! … and cheers to being a good reader …. gotta love our peeps!

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Pingback: A hike around the ranch | breezes at dawn

  32. Too familiar with those blues! But, as you say one has to find a balance. You have mastered it and I admire what and how you do it!
    Twice in a year, I am dealing with distressing situations and I obviously find it hard to be ‘on schedule’ with my posts -especially my art work posts. Each one takes 2 days to prepare [that is, after a painting is done!] and I seldom find the time lately. So I may indeed decide to take a break, escalating my current level [3], to No1. One thing’s for sure, my energy levels are very low and the reserves need to be used elsewhere…
    That said… I am ready for tomorrow’s musical! 😉

    Like

  33. I completely understand the blogging blues as I sit here, again, debating the direction I want to take with my blog. With the kids older, the eldest having moved out, I don’t have as much material as I used to unless I write from old experiences. What many may not realize when they read my blog, is how much of a news hound I am, thus the thought crosses my mind on whether or not I should be political in my writings? Then I think, do I want to alienate everyone? Also the young man is taking up all my time with movies, a difficult & long board game, and just plain old conversation.

    Like

    • Catherine,
      A blogger must have direction, and that direction is subject to change, thus an evolving process in itself.

      Politics are fine, but as I well know, it limits your audience. In terms of alienating anyone, part of the equation is how the host writes and sets the tone.

      Hey – movie reviews is something that captures the attention of many.

      Like

  34. Well, I’m on a job, so can’t blog as much. I only get a bit blue because I enjoy blogging, and miss it when I’m on an assignment! Nonetheless, there comes a day when I’ll be back!

    Like

  35. Hi I followed a link to here. I like what you said however, my insides were going wow what people pleasing. Perhaps this comes as I write my blogs for me, if anyone else happens to like or to identify with what i write great if not…not important to me. I also think it’s whining or groveling to have to give imaginary persons justifications for what one is doing. Having to announce to the populous, who of course must hang upon my every word, who will just simply pine away and die if I do not tell them that I am not blogging. Uhm… is my own defect of character. I am sharing my views as i liked what you wrote.

    Like

    • Elisa,
      Thanks for coming over (I presume from Robin). I’ve read your comment three times, and I’m still unsure (and that’s OK). Then again, I also sense deep thought.

      My main reason for announcing a break to one’s readers is simple – when unannounced, readers worry about the host … are the ill? Did something serious happen? Did they die? … Loyal readers care, and by announcing a break, they don’t have to worry.

      Many thanks for sharing.

      Like

  36. A great post Frank!
    Right now – mostly the kids & their activities create my blogging schedule – darn kids. LOL
    BTW – I like the video. I added the song to one of my YouTube lists. 🙂

    Like

  37. Excellent post dear Frank… I feel the effects of the so called Blogging Blues… And, you are right> they are real … and we are not immune from them!… Balance is the key factor… This year I decided I’ll be posting twice a month… My posts have paintings and imply a lot of research… So I work on them… Besides the other factor here is> other bloggers… How do we do to catch up with them?… And the comments on our posts?… It takes time, right?… I believe it is up to each one of us at the end!… Love and all the best to you. Aquileana ⭐

    Like

    • Aquileana,
      Excellent points. Your posts are very research heavy, so twice a month is very understandable. I also know that you have heavy volume, so keeping up with replying to comments must be a huge task in itself. Being one who believes in replying to comments, I appreciate your energy.

      Even after all that time, getting elsewhere is very time consuming. I’m a firm believer in reciprocating as much as possible, so that self-imposed pressure that takes time. …. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Pingback: Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 257 | A Frank Angle

  39. some people lose their mojo because they started their blog as being too narrowly focused, and they found it difficult to write about that one area or topic over a long period of time. that’s why i find it better to blog about anything. i’m not interested in your take on movies, television, music, etc. i’m interested in your take on anything. for me, i find people interesting, not topics. whether it’s commercials, food, politics doesn’t matter. what an interesting individual has to say is what matters to me. when someone can present an idea, a direction, and present it well with supporting evidence and maybe some humor so as to keep it light – that’s what i find interesting.

    as for me, i greatly switched directions when i realized how much the “fun” stuff was taking time and words away from fiction. i knew i would lose a lot of people, but i also knew that i would get more accomplished in terms of what i want to accomplish, not what others might want me to accomplish. that was my sacrifice, and it has worked out well.

    Like

    • Rich,
      Many great points here. I know I started as politics and sports … then hit that wall you mentioned, which the morphing started with me. Obviously, I’m a big supporter of eclectic topics. Meanwhile, you must see my next post … actually my first-ever fiction post. Please come by … but don’t be too rough on me. 😉

      Like

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  48. I don’t ever blog out of obligation or addiction to likes and high stats, I blog because I love writing poetry, and when no poetry comes to me, I just don’t blog, simple as that for me, and, if more than one poem comes to me in a day, I might post both that day, or I might schedule it for the next day.

    Now, comments are another issue, as well as likes, they can be a chore to try and keep up with the over 7 thousand followers between my 2 blogs, so I give myself the permission to go where I want, when I want and to comment, like, reblog, etc., although I hardly ever comment on either one of my blogs, because my poetry is too close to my heart, and to chit chat about it does something to me where the pottery muse leaves me, thus, the no commenting on my blogs by me, I used to feel guilty about it, however, I don’t anymore: I have the right to run my blogs how it works for me.

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