On a Blogging Series

My post On the Blogging Blues (April 27, 2015) was not only well received, readers provided many worthwhile comments about related topics. While the post focused on the importance and types of blogging breaks as a way to prevent the blogging blues, I collects the comments, organized them into topics, then paraphrased the wording.

This is the first post featuring those comments – all about blogging. Future topics include Breaks & the Blues, Community, Posting & Frequency, and Writing, Thanks to everyone for your valuable contribution.

Topic: Blogging
Trying to visit and comment almost every day is important – but on really busy days, I give myself permission to delete the notification emails.

Finding the right ratio of posting to spending time on other blogs is difficult. Cutting back posts is a way to have the time to read others and stay connected.

Reducing posting frequency is a way to enjoy blogging and keep longevity – plus it gives time for other things in life.

Blogging is posting, replying to comments, and reading/commenting elsewhere.

Humans are creatures designed for learning. Whether researching to write or reading others work on blogs is a way to learn.

Finding the balance between managing your own blog and visiting others is difficult – but it’s also different for everyone.

Nothing about blogging should be forceful.

Blogging a hobby, not a career.

Etiquette is important in all human encounters – blogging included.

I blog because I love to write and interact with people all over the world.

Reading mindful posts fuels the mind.

One size doesn’t fit all.

Blogging should be fun and without stress.

Use your notification tools wisely.

Blogging etiquette is important, but most people don’t know what it is.

Keeping up with all the posts of the bloggers I follow is difficult.

Posting, replying to comments, and reading/commenting elsewhere is a high-energy commitment.

Somewhere we get the idea that blogging every day and having hundreds–nay thousands- of followers is virtuous.

You can’t please everyone, so you’ve got to please yourself.

Blogs fuel the need for meaningful contact. Visiting thoughtfully tended blogs energizes the mind.

I came for writing but stayed for friendships.

The positive experiences of blogging cause some to think twice before stopping.