On The Donald … the Real One

Background
Created in 1934 at Walt Disney Productions

Voiced by Clarence Nash until Mickey’s Christmas Carol (1983)

Tony Anselmo (mentored by Nash) voiced starting with Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

First animated by Dick Huemer and Art Babbit

Dick Lundy developed Donald’s character.

Drawn in comics by Al Taliaferro, Carl Barks, and Don Rosa

Development

  • Started as an extra character
  • Appeared with Goofy as a supporting character to Mickey Mouse
  • Eventually developed into the main character
  • Followed a similar path in comics

Filmography
Appearing in over 150 theatrical films and shorts

Has the most theatrical appearances than any Disney character

First appeared in The Wise Little Hen (1934)

Second appearance in Orphan’s Benefit served as first encounter with Mickey Mouse

First appeared with Mickey and Goofy in Mickey’s Service Station (1935)

First star billing in Donald’s Ostrich (1937)

Personal/Personality
Middle name is Fauntleroy, thus the only major Disney character with an official middle name

Original name was Donald Oliver Duckling

Dressed in a blue sailor shirt, a white cap with a black or red bow tie

Most distinguishable characteristic is his speech

Personality described as mischievous, temperamental, a show-off, bragger, tenacious, and positive

Donald isn’t a sailor, but wears a sailor outfit because Daisy likes men in uniforms

Catch Phrases

  • “What’s the big idea!?”.
  • “Aw, phooey!
  • “Hiya, toots!”.
  • “So!!!”
  • Muttering, “Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy.

Family, Friends, and Foes
Nephews Huey, Louie and Dewey (introduced 1938)

Twin sister: Thelma (Della) Duck, but also referred to as Dumbella (introduced 1937)

Cousin Gus Goose (introduced 1939)

European Uncle Ludwig von Drake (introduced 1961)

Rich uncle Scrooge McDuck (introduced 1947)

Girlfriend, Daisy (introduced 1937), but was originally named Donna Duck

Family tree according to Carl Barks

Image from Wikipedia

Image from Wikipedia

Donald’s wants to be Disney’s biggest star, thus the rivalry with Mickey Mouse Throughout his career, which resembles the Bugs Bunny-Daffy Duck rivalry

Consider the Mouseketeers theme to “D-O-N-A-L-D D-U-C-K! Donald Duck!” … or the Mouseketeer theme with chants of “Donald Duck” after mentioning Mickey

Foes include Chip ‘n’ Dale, Humphrey the Bear, Spike The Bee, Mountain Lion Louie, Bootle Beetle, Witch Hazel (in Trick or Treat), Aracuan Bird, and Baby Shelby

Honors
Received 8 non-winning Oscar nominations for Good Scouts (1938), Truant Officer Donald (1941), Donald’s Crime (1945), Chip ‘n’ Dale (1947), Tea for Two Hundred (1948), Toy Tinkers (1949), Rugged Bear (1953), and No Hunting (1955)

Oscar winner for Best Animated Short Film: Der Fuehrer’s Face (1943), a parody of Nazi Germany

TV Guide’s list of the 50 greatest cartoon characters of all time (#43) in 2002

He has appeared in more films than any other Disney character, and is the most published comic book character in the world outside of the superhero genre

A mini-series of seven short films following Donald’s life in the army from being drafted to basic training to being in an actual mission

Thanks in part to the mini-series supporting the war effort, Donald graced the nose artwork of virtually every type of WWII Allied combat aircraft

Miscellaneous
In the Disney Studios, Donald is often referred to as “The Duck”

Walt Disney described Donald Duck as Disney’s “problem child”

A duck skeleton that looks like Donald can be seen in James and the Giant Peach

Donald makes a cameo appearance in The Little Mermaid

Donald Duck is the only popular film and TV cartoon character to appear as a sports team mascot (Oregon Ducks at the University of Oregon)

Donald Duck Orange Juice, introduced by Citrus World in 1940.

A video game Donald Duck: Goin’ Quackers

Below is a compilation tribute and the short earning his first Oscar nomination  (Good Scouts) … Enjoy

Life: The Musical – Epilogue

The Story
Life: The Musical is an original aFa production is a journey featuring songs of about life. Each act features an aspect of life as a theme with music supplied around that theme.

Program (Past Posts)
LifeTheMusicalAct 1: Life
Act 2: Born
Act 3: Names
Act 4: Young
Act 5: Dream
Act 6: Teens
Act 7: School
Act 8: Adulthood
Act 9: Work
Act 10: Play
Act 11: Hope
Act 12: Love
Act 13: Positive Emotions
Act 14: Negative Emotions
Act 15: Growing Old
Act 16: Death
Act 17: Remembrance

Epilogue

Epilogue: a section or speech at the end of a book or play that serves as a comment on or a conclusion to what has happened (Oxford Dictionary)

From birth to death, from young to old, from emotions to work and play, Life: The Musical has taken attendees through the journey of life. The 17 acts captured snippets of life, but as we know, life is so much more.

Alisha (Abtwixt) submitted a song in Act 16 (Death) that sparked this epilogue. Although originally written for Lost (the TV show), the performing artist in this video recorded this with something personal in mind. He posted these words on his YouTube post.

Most of you know that I received a second chance at life after a donor heart was placed in my chest on September 9, 2009. Ironically, my younger brother passed away 3 months earlier while I waited for the transplant surgery. He was unable to donate his organs. Today, beating in my chest is the heart of another young man who like my brother has gone home to the God who gave us life. (Paul Cardall)

Yes, life is much to life, sometimes simple, other times complicated. Times full of joy, and testy, frustrating, and gut-wrenching. Many of you have songs in your heart about life .. the songs with lyrics that touch you personally. In that spirit, I invite you to post a song about life, and if you can, please share a short note of why your choice is important to you.

Wishing you nothing but the best in your life … and thank you for being part of mine.

Life: The Musical – Act 17: Remembrance

The Story
Life: The Musical is an original aFa production is a journey featuring songs of about life. Each act features an aspect of life as a theme with music supplied around that theme.

Program (Past Posts)
LifeTheMusicalAct 1: Life
Act 2: Born
Act 3: Names
Act 4: Young
Act 5: Dream
Act 6: Teens
Act 7: School
Act 8: Adulthood
Act 9: Work
Act 10: Play
Act 11: Hope
Act 12: Love
Act 13: Positive Emotions
Act 14: Negative Emotions
Act 15: Growing Old
Act 16: Death

Act 17
Life … the time for the living to live. One’s life starts when one is born. Shortly thereafter, we are given something that stays with us no matter where we go – a name. Immediately, we are nourished, so we grow physically, mentally, and emotionally from babies into young children … and that’s when we start to dream about our future life. Growth never stops, so from children we move on as teens .. but school is still much of life at this point.

Eventually, we move into adulthood as women and men with many things going on in our life. Whether its work, play, or family, life can be complicated, so many times we hope for the best. Maybe above all else, people desire love, and go through many ups and downs in that quest.

No matter the situation, human encounters also provide a wide-range of emotions over a life with ups and downs. Time marches on. Although one gets older with each day, one grows old … and then, whether expected or suddenly – the last breath is taken – life as we know it is over, but one lives on in the memory of others.

Act 17 features songs with memory, memories, remember, remembering, remembered, or remembrance in the title.

Production Note
To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please 1) include the song title and artist in your text, and 2) paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement
Ladies and gentleman, all we have to say is welcome to The King singing Memories.

Life: The Musical – Act 16: Death

The Story
Life: The Musical is an original aFa production is a journey featuring songs of about life. Each act features an aspect of life as a theme with music supplied around that theme.

Program (Past Posts)
LifeTheMusicalAct 1: Life
Act 2: Born
Act 3: Names
Act 4: Young
Act 5: Dream
Act 6: Teens
Act 7: School
Act 8: Adulthood
Act 9: Work
Act 10: Play
Act 11: Hope
Act 12: Love
Act 13: Positive Emotions
Act 14: Negative Emotions
Act 15: Growing Old

Act 16
Life … the time for the living to live. One’s life starts when one is born. Shortly thereafter, we are given something that stays with us no matter where we go – a name. Immediately, we are nourished, so we grow physically, mentally, and emotionally from babies into young children … and that’s when we start to dream about our future life. Growth never stops, so from children we move on as teens .. but school is still much of life at this point.

Eventually, we move into adulthood as women and men with many things going on in our life. Whether its work, play, or family, life can be complicated, so many times we hope for the best. Maybe above all else, people desire love, and go through many ups and downs in that quest.

No matter the situation, human encounters also provide a wide-range of emotions over a life with ups and downs. Whereas the previous act featured positive emotion, Act 14 is about negative emotions – so, all song titles must have a negative emotion in the song title. (The producers says stay away from love unless the title is a negative emotion.)

Time marches on. Although one gets older with each day, one grows old … and then, whether expected or suddenly – the last breath is taken – life as we know it is over. Song titles for Act 16 must contain death, die, dies, died, dead, or dying in the title.

Production Note
To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please 1) include the song title and artist in your text, and 2) paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement
The beautiful thing about music and all the arts is that people continue to enjoy the work even after the artist has died. We got to know this artist when as one of the four young lads from England during the early 1960s. Although two are gone, he’s here to sing Live and Let Die … we welcome Sir Paul McCartney and Wings!

On Popeye Day

Get ready to sing along because today is Popeye Day! (Words will appear during the second stanza)

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During my youth, the Mr. Cartoon Show at 4 in the afternoon on WSAZ provided my weekday cartoon fix … and Popeye the Sailor was the star of the show. Once I learned about Saturday being Popeye Day (actually celebrating his comic strip debut in 1929), I delayed the next Explore post because this is the perfect opportunity to revisit some classic characters through past posts.

Here’s the main cast of characters
Popeye
Olive Oyl
Bluto
Wimpy

Which did you visit?

On Selma: A Perspective

Selma: The movie

Setting: Selma, Alabama, early 1965 during the Civil Rights era

Me: At the time, a 12-year old living in rural Ohio, and oblivious to the actual meaning of the movement, but aware of events at a 12-year-old level

The movie trailer

From the opening scene, Selma is a historical, powerful, suspenseful drama that took me through many emotions – shock, sad, joy, shame, pride, surprise, awe, and probably others. Although I knew elements of the story and how it ends, the film was absorbing and suspenseful. Although it appeared to creep through time, the film moved at a reasonable pace and kept me engaged.

The film centers on important names that I already know: Martin Luther King, Andrew Young, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis, Ralph Abernathy, Malcolm X, Lyndon Johnson, and George Wallace … and some important ones that I didn’t know. I don’t know what percentage of the film is factual, but I’m confident that enough of it is for historical relevancy.

I appreciated David Oyelowo’s portrayal of Dr. King, and wow … the voice and the demeanor! As Dr. King’s wife, Carmen Ejogo’s displayed someone stoic, solid, and supportive.

Tributes to the event with video and images

Selma is a cultural barometer that provokes thought. Because then and now are points in time, it shows how far American society has come since those dark days yet, it should help one realize how far we still have to go. Shamefully, events like Ferguson, Missouri, New York City, and others still exist, but there is no way I can be convinced that the overall situation isn’t better today than 1965 and earlier … and Selma helps cement my belief.

With Martin Luther King Day being this coming Monday, this weekend would be an excellent time to see Selma.

Below is a short video that starts in the early 60s yet ends in 2009. It’s one of my favorite videos here because it speaks volumes to me about perspective, about growth, and about the hope that humanity can provide.

On the First Feline Star

Felix, a squatty black cat with wide eyes and a recognizable smile, is the first true animation star. His popularity during the silent film era matched that of film stars.

It’s time to watch the screen to sing along with his introduction

The Early Years
Felix’s origins are disputable; but linked to Pat Sullivan and Otto Messmer

His prototype’s first appearance is disputable, either Feline Follies (1919) or Tail of Thomas the Kat – but Felix wasn’t the name in either

Adventures of Felix (1919) marked the appearance of Felix as the name

Besides is his popularity, there was a successful transition from screen to print with over 250 newspapers in syndication with the comic strip

Supporting characters include Willie Jones (his master), Skiddoo (mouse), Inky, Dinky, & Winky (nephews, and Kitty (girlfriend)

US Navy Fighter Squadron 2-B chose Felix as a mascot, thus appeared holding a bomb on the side of F-3 biplanes (1920s)

New York Yankees adopt Felix as the team mascot (1922)

Logansport High School (Indiana) choses Felix as the school mascot (1926), and remains so today … although their nickname is the Berries

Charles Lindbergh took a Felix doll on his historic solo flight across the Atlantic (1927)

Felix appeared as the first balloon in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade (1927)

RCA used a papier-mâché Felix doll in a test as one of the first images ever broadcast by television (1928)

Felix’s last silent film was The Last Life (1928)

Felix the Cat by Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra

Felix Kept on Walking by Paul Whiteman

Post-Silent Film Era
Transition from silent to sound unsuccessful as new characters became more popular

1st voiced by Mae Questral (1936)

Animation transitioned to Joe Oriolo (and eventually Don Oriolo), who produced 264 shorts featuring Felix (voiced by Jack Mercer for 29 years)

Felix, now less mischievous, using a “bag of tricks” became his trademark

First full feature film was Felix the Cat: The Movie (1988)

DreamWorks Animations currently own Felix the Cat

Newer Opener

Honors
#28 TV Guide’s Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time (2002)

#89 British Television Channel 4 poll of 100 Greatest Cartoon Characters (2004)

#36 Animal Planet’s 50 Greatest Movie Animals (2004)

Enjoy this tribute