On the USA as a Christian Nation: Part 4 of 4 – My Conclusion

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The purpose of this series is obvious: To examine the notion that the United States of America was founded as a Christian nation, or at least on Christian values and principles. The focus of the previous three posts were the following:

This post (Part 4) focuses on my conclusions and thoughts based on my research. Unlike the previous posts in this series, my thoughts are debatable and subject to agreement and disagreement. Keep in mind that each paragraph stands alone as part of a list – not as flowing text. I numbered the points for easy identification.

Concluding Statements

1) Most of the Framers were either born in a portion of the current United Kingdom (UK) or born of parents from the UK – a place holding a connection between God and Liberty – and a place that was predominantly Christian. The same would be the same for those from the Colonies. The God and Liberty concept is based on the inalienable rights of equality coming from God, so liberty is a God-given right (yet some of these Framers had slaves).  From there, it is up to the people in their life and government to use their goodness and virtue to act for the common good of all.

2) Using their Christian-Judeo background, experiences, knowledge of European democracy, and cognitive reasoning, the Framers established a new paradigm known as the US Constitution to differentiate itself from England.

3) The Framers recognized religious influence on English Common Law and in daily life. After all, Blue Laws keeping businesses closed on Sundays were common place for nearly 200 years. The Christian notion of marriage is well established, only to be recently redefined by the Supreme Court.

4) Although the list could go on, the USA being founded on Christian principles/values should not be denied. Then again, there are numerous principles/values that Christians share with multiple religions as well as various non-believer groups as atheists and agnostics. Many principles/values could be considered as secular or simply common to humanity. Therefore, although they may be rooted in Christianity, the founding documents do not promote uniquely Christian principles/values.

5) The relationship between God and Liberty in the US Constitution is clear to me – but not in the same way as others may see it. The Framers saw “unalienable rights” as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness coming from a higher power than human government – not necessarily the Christian God – but rather the god of one’s choosing if they have one.

6) Whereas the Puritans foresaw a strict religious state, other religious leaders during Colonial times (as William Penn and Roger Williams) envisioned religious tolerance as something good – and through their actions and the First Amendment, America became a place for numerous religious minorities.

10) The Framers used generic language to be inclusive. As America grew into a melting pot of diversity, those unalienable right were for Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs, Secularists, Humanists, Atheists, Agnostics, Christians, and whoever I unintentionally left out.

11) The union between religion and politics is not new because their relationship in America is older than the country itself. During the foundation period of this new country, religious groups influenced the process. Just because some groups desired a Christian nation then and that some groups desire the same today does not mean the United States was established as a Christian nation.

12) The people established the United States of America with a government that is neutral on religion while leaving religious decisions to individuals – not to the federal government, not to any state, not to any political party, and not to any religious organization. Again – the right is to individuals.

When the underlying principle has been examined in the crucible of litigation, the Court has unambiguously concluded that the individual freedom of conscience protected by the First Amendment embraces the right to select any religious faith or not at all.Justice John Paul Stevens in Lee v. Weisman (1992)

13) The notion of a “Christian America” is a myth. The United States of America was not founded as a Christian nation – it never has been a Christian nation – and is not now! If the framers intended to create a Christian nation, would wouldn’t documents say so? Wouldn’t the intent be overtly obvious?

14) Some of the Framers were outward men of faith – others simply men of private prayer and reflection – and others with no religious belief . Nonetheless, these men sought who intentionally sought religion neutrality. Just as enthusiastic theists can extrapolate references and phrases involving words as God, Creator, and more; others can easily apply the same words in a generic context with an understanding of the god they worship – and without endorsing a particular religion.

The Bottom Line

Today, leaders within the Christian Right continue to perpetuate the myth by cherry-picking data, stretching correlations, and disregarding inconvenient details. No matter the eloquence in their words, anyone stretching the words of our founding documents into Biblical reference is attempting to impose their belief system onto others through politics. Sadly, opinions on the USA as a Christian nation can be aligned with political parties.

Yes – I am Christian – but in no way do I subscribe that branch of Christian thought. As a matter of fact, I am confident the “Christian America” myth is a minority view within American Christianity. There probably also a strong correlation between those promoting the myth and their selfish view of religious liberty.  Perhaps this myth is similar to that of biological evolution – that is, people think they know, but they actually don’t.

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On the USA as a Christian Nation: Part 3 of 4 – The No

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Question 2: Was the United States of America founded as a Christian nation?

The idea that the United States was founded as a Christian nation has been around since the country’s inception. Whereas the previous post listed the reasons supporting the claim, the purpose of this post is not to debate the issue, but to provide reasons for saying NO – the United States was not founded as a Christian nation. I welcome discussion and comments, but ask commenters to stay on topic. I numbered the reasons for easy identification. The next post will provide my concluding statements about this topic that are debatable.

Reasons Why the USA was Not founded as a Christian Nation

1) The Framers had the benefit of hundreds of years of history to develop a government – a history with the state persecuting religion – a history including the church controlling the state

2) Although six colonies were founded with official religions, no states have official religions

3) Just because some of the Framers were Christian is a fact about the framers, and nothing to do with the USA being a Christian nation

4) Other than personal writings, there is no definitive evidence of the Framers’ intent to establish a Christian nation

5) Examining individual writings does not provide Framer’s intent – but rather provides insight into the individual’s belief system

6) The Revolutionary War was not a religious event – although freedom of religion movement did piggyback the freedom for liberty movement

7) The Declaration of Independence uses “Creator” – but that is a term accepted by Christians, Jews, Muslims, Deists, Secularists, and others

8) Implying the three branches of Federal government established in the US Constitution directly correlates with Isaiah 33:22 is one example (of many) that are disparate attempts to establish the USA as a Christian nation (The Lord is judge, the Lord is our ruler, and the Lord is our king; he will save us.)

9) Although some states included religious preferences for elected officials, Article VI clearly states, “ … but no religious test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trusts under the United States” – which the US Supreme Court has upheld.

10) The Bible does not include any covenant between God and the United States

11) The US Constitution does not mention “God”, “Christ”, “Jesus”, or “Jesus Christ”

12) The Declaration of Independence, US Constitution, and any of the Federalist Papers lack Biblical references, direct references to the Ten Commandments, Christianity, Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ being Savior

13) Although elected presidents may include “So help me God” to conclude their oath into office, those four words are not a Constitutional requirement (Article 2, Section 1)

14) Even if the Framers established the US Constitution on Christian values and principles, this does not imply the USA is a Christian nation

15) Demographics of the country at any point in time is meaningless to the discussion because the documents matter

16) Placing “In God We Trust” on money started in 1861 with roots in the Civil War – not the country’s founding

17) Including “One nation under God” into the Pledge of Allegiance occurred in 1954 as a response to Soviet Communism – not the country’s founding

18) One should not confuse cultural heritage with Biblical Christianity

19) After the Constitution became established, some religious groups called it “blasphemous” while urging formal recognition of Christianity into the Constitution. Organizations as the National Reform Association sought a Constitutional Amendment in 1864 to officially establish America as a Christian nation. Additional sizable movements also occurred in the 1950s and 1960s – and these beliefs still exist today.

20) Treaty of Tripoli (1797), which the Senate ratified and President Adams signed, clearly states, “ The Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.”

Next post: My personal concluding statements

On the USA as a Christian Nation: Part 2 of 4 – The Yes

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Question 2: Was the United States of America founded as a Christian nation?

This is not a new question. Some Americans think so – other think not. While the majority of Americans have been Christians for the vast majority (if not all) of the nation’s history, I aim this question at those saying the USA is officially Christian because the Framers intended to give special recognition of Christianity through its government.

The purpose of this post is not to debate the issue, but to provide reasons for saying YES – the United States was founded as a Christian nation. I welcome discussion and comments, but ask commenters to stay on topic. I numbered the reasons for easy identification. For the record, the No list is the next post.

Reasons Why the USA is a Christian Nation

1) The Puritans saw the New World (while founding the Massachusetts Bay Colony) as the New Israel – the New Jerusalem

2) Christianity was the predominant religion in colonial America – and their European roots were based in Christianity; so they naturally applied Christian/Biblical principles

3) The majority of the Framers were Christian

4) Writings by individual Framers provide evidence – such as

The moral principles and precepts contained in the scriptures ought to form the basis of all our civic constitutions and laws. All the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crim, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery, and war – proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.” (Noah Webster)

Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers; and it is the duty – as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.” (John Jay)

The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.” (John Adams)

5) Phrases as “In God We Trust and “One Nation under God” support Christianity

6) Eight of the original 13 colonies acknowledged Christianity in their colonial charters

7) The Declaration of Independence includes “Laws of nature and nature’s God” and “Endowed by their Creator”

8) The Article of Confederation (the precursor to the US Constitution) stated, “The Great Governor of the world”

9) The US Constitution establishes the Presidential Oath and many presidents say, “So help me God”

10) The US Constitution concludes with “In the year of the Lord.”

11) An early act of Congress (1782) promoted the Bible for circulation to and use in schools

12) Treaty of Paris (1784) is the negotiated agreement between the United States and Great Britain ending the Revolutionary War and recognizing the United States of America as a sovereign, independent nation.

In the name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity. It have pleased the Divine Providence to dispose the hearts of the most serene and most potent Prince George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, …. And of the United States of America, to forget all past misunderstandings and the differences.”

13) USA as a Christian nation is part of its identity

14) One can produce numerous parallels correlating the US Constitution and the Bible

15) In Holy Trinity v. United States (1892), Justice David Brewer writes for the majority of the court:

These, and many other matters which might be noticed, add a volume of unofficial declarations to the mass of organic utterances that this is a Christian nation. In the face of all these, shall it be believed that a Congress of the United States intended to make it a misdemeanor for a church of this country to contract for the services of a Christian minister residing in another nation?

Next Post: Reasons why the United States is not a Christian Nation.

On the USA as a Christian Nation: Part 1 of 4 – The Principles

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While in a class at church sometime in 2017, a classmate made a statement causing me to wince. To be fair, I can’t totally recall the exact statement, but it was one of these two: The United States being founded as a Christian nation or as one founded on Christian principles. (Personally, I think it was the latter.)

Fortunately, the idea wasn’t new to me because I’ve encountered such thoughts in my extensive study of the interchange between science and religion. However, this person’s statement increased my desire to want to know more – and now I’m ready to write posts about this issue.

This series of four consecutive daily posts will examine Christian principles/values, reasons for believing the United States was founded as a Christian nation, reasons against the thought, and my concluding statement.

Question 1: Was the United States of America founded on Christian principles?

To for those saying YES, I pose this question: Which principles? (I’ll make it easy, here’s a list.)

One God?
God as Creator of the universe?
God, the one with the final authority?
People are sinners?
Liberty as a God-given right?
Love the neighbor?
Honoring parents?
Doing no harm?
Being slow to anger, renouncing vengeance, and respecting life?
The Golden Rule?
Worship is personal; so no government will tell anyone how to worship?
Good citizenship?
Good moral behavior?
Favoring giving over receiving?
Community relationship with others?
Spiritual relationship with God?
God establishes truth?
Respect of others?
Respect of freedom of thought and expression?
Passing on traditions from one generation to the next?
Acting for the common good?
Civic responsibility?
Prudence?
Justice?
Temperance/restraint?
Grace?
Courage?
Faith?
Honesty?
Hope?
Charity?
Service?
Forgiveness?
Life everlasting?
The Resurrection?
The Holy Trinity?
The Day of Salvation?
The Ten Commandments?
Love, mercy, and forgiveness through the cross?
The Holy Bible as the guide for faith and practice?
Stewardship to others and to our surroundings?
Declaring Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord?

For anyone saying YES to any of the above, can you correlate these to the US Constitution? Is this list uniquely Christian?

Next post: Reasons why the United States is a Christian nation

On the Common Good

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Common good is at the center of any and all relationships involving two or more people. Although organizations embrace common good when developing a mission statement, putting it into action is easier said than done.

As a concept, common good may be easy to define as the benefit of society as a whole, but developing a meaning in today’s complex society would be difficult. After all, common good engages philosophy, morality, economics, culture, politics, religion, and more while having different meanings to different people and different groups. Even the Preamble to the US Constitution states, “… promote the general Welfare and secure the blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.” Is this statement same as common good?

Democracy depends on governance for the common good, but what that entails today may be a complex story in itself. Personally, I don’t have much confidence in elected officials being able to agree on a definition, let alone other aspects that would follow. However, common good is a concept that is so foundational, failure to agree is like trying to construct a building without a strong foundation.

To engage and implement common good, people must agree on the common facts. Even with agreement, disagreement on how to get to the common good is understandable – actually very likely because the different ways exist on achieving the common good. In the US, although Democrats and Republicans may agree on a common good, they may have fundamental differences on how to get there – and that’s fine.

However, declaring and accepting fake news fundamentally prevents agreement on the common facts – so doing for the common good would not only be highly improbable – but probably impossible.

If democracy is about the common good, then democracy must have reasonably well-informed citizens. Unfortunately, society includes those to whom truth is the enemy – the fools and liars who are misinformed and underinformed – let alone those who use a partisan lens to selectively filter the facts.

Life today is about information and fast access to it. The problem isn’t information’s availability or the mainstream media – not even the biased nature of well-known media personalities and outlets who feed red meat to their hungry flock.

A problem is the biased nature of a large slice of the public that selectively determines their preferred news source based on one that provides a message to hear – a message aligning with their predetermined view of the world.

A problem is when listeners determine immediate judgment on a legitimate news report because they have to protect their personal interests.

A problem is that given a fast and open information system, good journalism can give way to favoring expediency over accuracy.

A problem is that too many accept reports from obscure outlets as reliable because the story supports the preferred narrative the person desires.

A problem is that the truth is no longer a high priority.

All of these problems come together to prevent people from agreeing on the common facts – therefore no hope for acting for the common good. Perhaps that’s the greatest dangers to democracy.

On Trumpian Nostradamus 2

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Being that enough readers understood my first set of predictions about the Trump Administration for 2018, I went back to the crystal ball to see if I could find 10 more prognostications. Here’s the scoop.

1) President Trump negotiates a peace and economic agreement with North Korea; therefore avoid nuclear war. At the joint signing session, he embraces Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un while eating a taco bowl from the Trump Tower Grill and proclaims this agreement to be the greatest deal in the history of human existence. Kim Jong-un also announces an agreement to bring a Trump Tower Grill to Pyongyang.

2) President Trump unites the United States and China by building the greatest bridge in recorded history that joins Seattle and Shanghai. Because everyone knows he can build things, he will call it the Trump Bridge for Humanity, then proclaim it as the greatest architectural and engineering feat in human history that will never be outdone.

3) President Trump supports the final report issued by Special Counsel Investigation led by Robert Mueller. After lauding Mueller and his team, President Trump pardons everyone involved including himself, and invites all pardonees to enjoy celebratory taco bowl from the Trump Tower Grill.

4) President Trump ends Russia-US tensions by negotiating the most unbelievable deal in modern history as he becomes the first person ever to lead two independent countries at the same time. Known in Russia as Czar Genius, he proclaims Vladimir Putin to be the head of all oligarchs in Russia, primary advisory, and Global Ambassador.

5) President Trump negotiates an agreement between the Israelis and the Palestinians. The deal – a really big fantastic deal for both sides – something no US president has ever been able to do – actually the best deal ever for not only the Middle East, but for the world.

6) President Trump buys 3 failing media outlets: CNN, Washington Post, and New York Times – and vows to turn them into the biggest and greatest news organizations that will only reports real news.

7) President Trump scraps the Iran Nuclear deal because it was Obama’s fault – but then renegotiates a much better, more fair deal – actually an unbelievable deal – the best deal that Iran has ever seen – a deal that also includes building a Trump Tower in Tehran – and yes, it includes the Trump Tower Grill so Iranians can eat the world-renown Taco Bowl.

8) After taking credit for no deaths from commercial plane crashes in 2017, President Trump blames President Obama for a recent plane crash.

9) President Trump announces that he will build a wall along the southern US border that Mexico will pay for. The wall – a big, beautiful wall – one more beautiful than anyone imagined. The top of the wall includes a running lane, a fishing pier allowing fisherman to cast lines from the top of the wall into the Rio Grande River, and food venues serving tacos from the Trump Tower Grill.

10) President Trump describes himself as humbled, honored, and as the greatest humanitarian in human history after being awarded multiple Nobel Prizes.

On a Year Later

At 12 noon on 20 January 2017, Donald J Trump became the 45th president of the United States. I intentionally timed this post for publication to meet the one year anniversary of him taking the oath to ask this question: What has he learned about holding the highest office of the land? What has he learned being a business person without any experience in holding any political office in any level of government? What has he learned about occupying the Oval Office, the setting for who many consider as the Leader of the Free World.

Yes, What has he learned? Below are ten key points that I believe he has learned about the presidency since his inauguration one year ago.

 

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