Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 423

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The final Weekend Concert was unbelievable! Thanks to all, and an extra thanks from the bottom of my heart to Dale for her energy and kindness.

Looking at the remaining posts, I finally started charting my departure. I will say that if all goes as planned, I will be around into early February.

Obligations this past week have put me behind – but I’m trying to catch up.

Cincinnati was named after Roman leader Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus was known for good governance. Because he saw himself as a modern day Cincinnatus, Benito Mussolini donated a statue (in 1931) to Cincinnati (as well as Rome, New Year and Rome, Georgia). That statue has resided in a city park ever since. A Cincinnati council member is considering the statue’s removal. Like any place, the city has its share of issues – but sorry – that is not worth the time and effort.

Although young by European standards, the Cincinnati Symphony will celebrate its 125th year at next weekend’s concert.

The Ohio Medical Board received a submission that being a Browns or Bengals fan in Ohio is a condition that should qualify for medical marijuana treatment.

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The January 5th Meet the Press episode was (for me) one of the best ever. After the opening segment about Iraq, most of the show focused on lies, fake news, biases, and more.

Forgot to mention this last week. I observed this in one home I visited during the holidays. These items were clearly visible: Trump – Make America Great sticker on the outside front door, Trump wall calendar, Trump bobblehead, Trump ashtrays, framed pic of the First Couple, and Trump stickers for holiday cards.

The killing of an Iranian general was significant news. It was also a prime example of how can one believe a president who routinely lies and distorts? If there was a national disaster/event that requires the president to make a national address, who would the listener know if they are receiving the truth?

Until the impeachment proceedings, I have never heard of Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA). The man is a piece of work. Whew. Now he states Democrats “in love with terrorists” and they “mourn Soleimani more than they mourn our Gold Star families who are the ones who suffered under Soleimani.” I yield to a great American orator for my brief response.

I seldom read the columnists from the left or the right, but a recent one by Mark Thiessen (conservative, Washington Post) caught my attention. Personally, it gave me new-found respect for him and provided a faint glimmer of hope. If you are interested, click here.

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Weekly Headlines from The Onion (combos welcome)

Man still can’t believe he’s not a virgin
Report: Only 2% of internet worth sitting through 15-second ad
Man doesn’t want to put too much effort into fixing up house he just going to burn down
Study finds comparing yourself to others actually a pretty good way to gauge success
Woman ties reading shampoo bottle directions in French first to test if she’s secretly smart
Las Vegas residents worried that proposed construction of new casino will bring in riff-raff

Interesting Reads

Advertisers tracking people
The first humans to the Americas
Who was Buddah?
Art of decision making
Differences in snowflakes
Wines around the world
(Graphic) Changing demographics of China and India
(Pictures) An ice festival in China
(Pictures) Culturally important sites in Iran

To send you into the weekend, here’s a Van Morrison song I’ve always enjoyed. In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On Paris in Cincinnati

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This post is one that I’ve wanted to do for many years. As part of my cleaning out the blog closet project, I had to remove the thought from my mind. Although I’ve taken the Paris-Cincinnati flight several times, I’ve never visited the City of Lights. Surely I have to get there someday.

Meanwhile, this will have to do because Paris is alive and well in Cincinnati. In no way am I comparing the two cities, but a touch of Paris is in my area – and some close to my residence. To rid this blog idea from my mind, I got images from elsewhere, but I have visited these locations.

Paris 1900: City of Entertainment was a temporary exhibit at the Cincinnati Art Museum in early 2019. For whatever reason, I didn’t attend, but you can see the exhibit by clicking here. Meanwhile, onto the tour.

 

Kings Island is an amusement park located away from the city center northeast of downtown Cincinnati. Opening in 1971, its Eiffel Tower (one-third of the size of the original) serves as an iconic landmark that is easily visible by motorists driving by on I-71. When I first came to the area, I could see the tower and the nightly fireworks from my balcony. Today, I can still hear them in the distance. Kings Island is also a popular destination for roller coaster enthusiasts.

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Chateau Laroche is also known as Loveland Castle. Don’t you think it has a French look? This unique structure is built on the banks of the Little Miami River. Amazingly, one person (Harry Andrews) built it from stones he carried from the river over 50+ years to create this place based on a castle in southern France. Upon his death, Andrews donated the castle to his Boy Scout troop – Knights of the Golden Trail. Of course, the castle is open to the public. Here’s the website.

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St. Mary’s Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington, Kentucky (directly across the Ohio River from downtown Cincinnati) is a stunning must-see for visitors to the area. I’ve never been to the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris (and given the fire, I may never). However, the Covington Basilica gives me the feel of what it may be like, but on a much smaller scale.

Dedicated in 1901, the outer west face is an exact copy of the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris and the inside is stunning. Below are two resources to learn and see more

Hope you enjoyed this Paris-Cincinnati connection.

On a Beech Walk: #67 (The Hidden World)

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I like walking the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Eyes allow us to see much – the powdery sand, the waves moving toward shore then gliding across the sandy upslope, the blue sky, the shiny sun and its reflections, plus much more.

When we concentrate to look carefully and closely, we notice so much more. Oh the wonderful details that nature offers us – the designs, patterns, colors – not only here where I walk, but throughout the natural world.

However, today I wonder about the hidden world – the world that we cannot see with the unaided eye. The world that is too small, too far away, too fast, too slow, or even covered or enclosed.

The hummingbird’s wings move fast and appear to us as a blur – yet technology can slow the video enough to capture the elegance of the wing motion and to notice similarities and differences with other winged creatures. The same video technology allows us to analyze fast human motions as running, skiing, skating, swinging a golf club, tennis racket, or baseball bat.

At the opposite end of the scale, technology can capture slow movements of massive structures as glaciers and tectonic plates. Movements that we measure in inches or centimeters per year.

As I peer across the sea, the water covers much that is below. Many things that are large enough to see with the unaided eye, but they are below the water. From ashore we cannot see the mountains, ridges, and canyons below – let alone all the aquatic life. The ocean’s depth is a world without light, so our vision is limited. This is a world of yet-to-be-discovered life. A world containing the lost-then-found; such as the Titanic and other sunken treasures.

Thinking about the water covering all that is below the surface, my mind sees a parallel to what is below the land’s surface. The life – minerals – signs of humanity’s past are not only below, but they are layered with the youngest closer to the top. Technology allows to see whatever is covered.

Whereas our skin and hair cover the internal world within us, various scans and imagery give medical professionals a closer look. The X-ray showing a bone fracture or a tumor. The MRI being able to visualize the brain by peeling it layer by layer like an onion. Laboratory tests that provide a view of much activity in the blood.

I look at my arm thinking about the invisible world that is too small to see with the unaided eye – a world that simple microscopes take us into – the world of single cells. The world of 2 or more groups of like cells organizing into tissues. The world being able to see various parts of a single cell. Parts that work together as a complex machine known as a life form.

Other technologies take us into the world of atoms and molecules that make up those cell parts. Atoms and molecules that are in constant motion – let alone comparing the motion of solids, liquids, and gases.

Telescopes allows us to explore the heavens above. That world has expanded with fly-by exploring missions as Voyager, Cassini, and others give us a closer view of our celestial neighbors, whereas the Hubble telescope delivers fascinating and mystical views of deep space.

It seems my brain hurts as I think about the hidden world that I cannot see because it is too small, too far away, too fast, too slow, or even covered or enclosed – but all of which technology allows us to see or at least understand. Maybe the hidden world is like a secret – that is unknown – but unlike a secret, one to be known.

For me, thinking is about making connections, which helps me understand and wonder about the world. Both of which are important as I walk the beach, after all, I like walking the beach is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

On a Weekend Concert: Duets

Duets

The Producer’s Guidelines

  1. Only songs by duets
  2. “Duets” defined as two performers who normally don’t perform together (Simon & Garfunkel is not a duet for this musical)
  3. No duplicate songs
  4. No duplicate duets (but a performer may be in a different duet)
  5. One song per person on Day 1 (except for the extras in the comment string), unlimited on Day 2 – but only new musicals
  6. To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line) – (I do not mind unembedding, so no  apologies are necessary)

Note: Return on Day 2 to submit more songs without limits. (My typical signal is posting a song for all attendees.)

PS Note: Type the duet in ALL CAPS (which is help others identify the duets used)

“Beer For My Horses” (TOBY KEITH & WILLIE NELSON) (Music starts at 0:58)

 

Past Concerts (Category): Beatles, Ex-Beatles, Moody Blues, Queen, Neil Diamond, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Aretha Franklin, Carole King, Elton John, Billy Joel, Crosby Stills Nash & Young (the group), Doobie Brothers, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, Journey, Prince, Guess Who, James Brown, Gloria Estefan, Broadway

This is the last in the series. Thank you!

Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 422

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Happy 2020! Welcome to the first OITS of 2020. On the other hand, I still don’t know how many more OITS there will be – but I know at least one! … but I’m guessing two.

The last Weekend Concert Series is this Saturday featuring Duets – two people together who normally are not together. The Producer says Simon & Garfunkel is not a duet for this concert – but Willie Nelson with Luiciano Pavarotti would be. Duets take the stage this Saturday 4 January at 1:00 AM (Eastern US).

Why Duets as the theme? Easy – This is a tribute to those who have interacted with me here at my little corner of the world. We have been a duet – and this is a way for me to say thank you!

My holiday period has been too hectic – and to the point of no fun. Plus, I missed many of your posts.

Being that I am on the final leg of my blog journal, the Q&A page/tab is an opportunity to ask questions. Not much activity. Hmmm …. wondering …. Should I take it down?

The Benevolent Impalers won the consolation game – therefore securing third place – but a disappointment after being the top seed. The Yahoo algorithms are a bit screwy. They rated my draft as a C and predicted my final record to be 5-7 in the regular season. After finishing 12-2, they gave me a C+ for the season. An odd analysis.

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Impeachment and the people involved continue to embarrass me.

The impeachment process continues to be a political spectacle while delivering a severe black eye onto the Founding Fathers. This article explains why 88 of the 100 senators should be disqualified as jurors.

This link made me laugh – 9 things President Trump says all the time.

I keep thinking about that America is more divided than in a long time, and we have a group saying “Keep America Great: …. Which to me means Keep America Divided.

To lead you into this week’s satirical headlines, The Onion provides tips for displaying artwork in your home.

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Weekly Headlines from The Onion (combos welcome)

Miracle dumbbell found in proper place on rack
Woman knows husband just acting affectionate because he wants food
All of area man’s positive qualities stolen from past friends
Man watches video about habits of effective artists so he too can be effective artist
Town hag getting in pretty good day of shaking jangly bell-covered stick while pointing and screaming ‘You Will Die!’
Fox News condemns 2020 election as partisan witch hunt orchestrated by Democrats to unseat President

Interesting Reads

A gene-editing experiment
Mistakes by science fiction
Can science rule out God?
Event that changed the course of Saudi history
The transition of St. Nick to Santa: A brief history
(Graphic) Space-Race History
(Pictures) BBC Readers’ Picks of the Year
(Pictures) National Geographic: Favorite Space Pics of 2019
(Pictures) BBC: Best space images of 2019

To send you into the weekend, let’s start 2020 with a bit of Lindsey Stirling. In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On 2019 to 2020

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A toast to my blog friends – those who have passed through my little corner of the world and those are remained. To friendships, to good people, to kindness, to respect, to dreams, to happiness, to good health, to a brighter tomorrow, and to love.

Happy New Year!

Which version of Auld Lang Syne to you select?

Singers

 

Singers and Bagpipes

 

Bagpipes

On Local Cubans

Marc (@Sorryless) loves Cuban sandwiches so much, he’s on infinite quest to find his favorite Cuban. As part of his mission, he is willing to travel miles and miles – and even posts about his ventures.

Whether I suggested or it, he was interested in my thoughts about his beloved sandwich in my area, I decided to jump into the fray. Locating nearby establishments was easy – so was trying them – but getting around to writing a post about them was difficult.  With all due respect to Marc, I had to do something!

I present the candidates.

Sharonville Depot Deli

Grilled Cuban – Ham & smoked grilled pork with bread and butter pickles, Muenster cheese, and Dijon mustard on Ciabatta

Lyle’s Trailside

Lyle’s BBQ Cuban – Pulled pork topped with shaved ham, melted provolone, mustard and pickles

Oasis Golf & Conference Center

Cuban Panini – Shaved ham and sliced pork loin with  brown mustard, pickles & pepper jack  cheese. Served in a grilled panini

 

Final Word

Each of the Cubans have positives and negatives, so it comes down to personal preferences

  • The most-fresh tasting – Depot Deli
  • The most hearty – Oasis
  • Most BBQ tasting – Lyle’s Trailside
  • Best presentation – Depot Deli
  • Best accompanying side – Lyle’s Trailside
  • Most surprising – Oasis
  • If I had to pick just one – Depot Deli

For me, given the range of flavors in a Cuban, it’s about balance. One has to be able to taste all the flavors without one particular flavor being too dominant.