On a Weekend Concert: Journey

Journey

The Producer’s Guidelines

  1. Only songs performed by Journey (no related solo acts)
  2. No duplicate songs
  3. Include the song title in your introduction text so others can see it
  4. One song per person on Day 1; unlimited on Day 2
  5. To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line) – (I do not mind unembedding, so no  apologies are necessary)

Note: Return on Day 2 to submit more songs without limits. (My typical signal is posting a song for all attendees.)

“Separate Ways”

 

Next Concert: Prince (Saturday 5th October 2019 @ 1:00 AM Eastern US)

Past Concerts (Category): Beatles, Ex-Beatles, Moody Blues, Queen, Neil Diamond, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Aretha Franklin, Carole King, Elton John, Billy Joel, Crosby Stills Nash & Young (the group), Doobie Brothers, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley

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Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 413

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The Weekend Concert Series returns this weekend with Journey taking to the stage. Concert time is this Saturday at 1:00 AM (Eastern US).

Week 2 of Dancing With The Stars revealed a new way of eliminating contestants – which to me is a result of the trend of viewers making goofy choices. Meanwhile, even though one contestant is typically eliminated each week, those who need to go early are identified – therefore, gives others time to develop into contenders.

Because I just mentioned television, I didn’t watch the Emmy Awards, but from what I’ve seen, gotta love Zendaya Coleman fashion statement.

A Cincinnati Reds legend had his final game this afternoon. Marty Brennaman has been the play-by-play  radio broadcaster for 46 years. He’s not only a local legend, but is also enshrined in the broadcaster’s wing at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. Maybe the first inning of his first game served as an omen. That’s when Hank Aaron tied Babe Ruth as the all-time homerun leader. Marty – thanks for all the memories!

About the game today. I didn’t watch on TV, I listened on a small, transistor-like radio beyond the final out through the post-game show. I turned on the television to watch the post-game ceremony. Yes – I shed a few tears.

Benevolent Impalers (my football fantasy team) lost it’s first game last week falling to 2-1. We got thumped. The opponents, the lowest scoring team in the league the first two weeks (and I the highest), achieved the highest scoring week of the season by far. My week was OK, but the opponents were on fire.

Did you know Popeyes is the official chicken of the Vatican? ( know Marc knows!)

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President Trump can no longer surprise me.

House Democrats have started an impeachment inquiry. This is the first step in the impeachment process, and it could also be the last step.

Although the US Constitution provides a mechanism for impeachment, there should not be any doubt that impeachment is a political process driven by party-first politics on both sides of the aisle. Unfortunately, what is best for the country cannot overcome tribalism.

A well-constituted court for the trial of impeachments is an object not more to be desired than difficult to be obtained in a government wholly elective. The subjects of its jurisdiction are those offenses which proceed from the misconduct of public men, or, in other words, from the abuse or violation of some public trust. They are of a nature which may with peculiar propriety be denominated POLITICAL, as they relate chiefly to injuries done immediately to the society itself. The prosecution of them, for this reason, will seldom fail to agitate the passions of the whole community, and to divide it into parties more or less friendly or inimical to the accused. In many cases it will connect itself with the pre-existing factions, and will enlist all their animosities, partialities, influence, and interest on one side or on the other; and in such cases there will always be the greatest danger that the decision will be regulated more by the comparative strength of parties, than by the real demonstrations of innocence or guilt. (from Federalist Paper: No. 65, Alexander Hamilton, 7 March 1788)

The end of the third quarter is a time for my latest odds.

  • President Trump being nominated: 97%
  • President Trump receiving my vote: 0%
  • Democratic nominee receiving my vote: 10%
  • President Trump winning re-election: 55%

To lead you into this week’s satirical headlines, The Onion provides a glimpse of what is happening in a high school science class. I wonder who will look here.

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Weekly Headlines from The Onion (combos welcome)

Every ingredient in recipe substituted for to avoid trip to store
Child concerned parents might never amount to anything
Nation perplexed by 16-year-old who doesn’t want the world to end
Obsessive-compulsive baseball player has to touch all 3 bases before going home
Man struggling to accept the fact that he’ll never move beyond medium salsa

Interesting Reads

Time with Turkish militants
Keeping working satellites safe
Death of Alexander the Great
Apps and the battle in Hong Kong
Mac & cheese and Mars
(Graphic) America’s political divide since 1994 (I love this one!)
(Photos) Milky Way photo contest winners
(Photos) Running of the wieners

To send you into the weekend, time for a bit of old school Frank style from Blue Man Group. In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On Three Exhibits

Click for excellent background music for this post from The Piano Guys.

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Typically, I take pictures at a museum exhibit with hopes of creating a post. Well, I never got around to writing these, so while cleaning out my blog closet, I decided to give a synopsis of them in one post. Sort of a Pictures at an Exhibition. Hope you enjoy the walk through the gallery

Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China

Unknown until 1974, this archaeological discovery is about the legion (over 8,000 life-sized figures) guarding the tomb of China’s first emperor. Not only multiple warriors, the exhibit included arms, armor, ornaments, ceramics, jewelry, and excellent information about this early civilization. The Cincinnati Art Museum hosted this fascinating exhibit.

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Chocolate: The Exhibition

Although it’s not true for everyone, but many people enjoy chocolate. Milk chocolate, dark chocolate, white chocolate, semi-sweet chocolate, chocolate milk, chocolate ice cream, brownies, fudge, and many more items. As a kid, I sprinkled cocoa powder onto my Rice Krispies, plus enjoyed Bosco! I still like an occasional gulp of straight Hershey Chocolate Syrup. So, I had to attend the exhibit at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

When first entering the exhibit, the smell of chocolate grabbed your attention. Yum! A large section of the exhibit focused on chocolate’s history. The German or Belgians come to mind, but hey – chocolate goes back to the Aztecs in Central America – so it made way to Europe from there! Uses, products, and production completed the exhibit. At the end, a local chocolatier provided samples. Yes – it was a good day.

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Guitars: Instruments that Rocked the World

Guitars have a fascinating history – and one much longer than many people may think. But did you know there is a National Guitar Museum? Yep – but it is a travelling exhibit without a permanent home!

Besides displaying some famous guitars, the exhibit included over 70 guitars of different styles, ages, and historical value (including one from 3000 BCE). Besides guitars, visitors can learn more about sound through numerous interactives. Toss in posters, graphics, banners, and the World’s Largest Playable Guitar, this exhibit is a winner for music lovers. Yes – I enjoyed this exhibit!

Click here to learn more about the National Guitar Museum and it’s exhibition schedule. I wonder if the museum will find a permanent home.

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On a Beach Walk: #57 (Wind)

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I like walking the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Wind is one of our earthly constants. Although it may only be slight at our planet’s surface, winds are constant throughout the atmosphere.

Today the wind is strong and gusty – not a whispery breeze. Today the wind provides a strong headwind as I walk.

Today the wind roars as it passes my ears. Today is more of a slap than a feathery touch – but tomorrow may be different.

Today’s wind causes me to think about other terms associated with wind – gales, gusts, squalls, storms, cyclones, hurricanes, typhons, tornadoes, vortices, and more. Other terms describing wind come to mind as sea breezes, mountain breezes, desert winds, easterlies, westerlies, prevailing, polar, topical, headwinds, tailwinds, crosswinds, and there are more.

The wind is as moody and fickle as people. Winds change throughout the day and from day to day. The winds of yesterday, today, and tomorrow are all different – yet the wind always speaks to us in the form of spirits, messages, metaphors, and similes. But do we listen? Does anyone even know the language it speaks? Maybe the wind just stimulates our own private thoughts.

The wind is mysterious. We don’t see it, but notice its effects. We can’t hold it, but feel it on our body.

Like us, the wind can be conflicting and complex in its messaging. Like the wind, change is constant in life – and an absolute certainty – especially as technology seems to be moving us to change faster and faster. To some, change is an uncontrollable feeling of a piece of paper being tossed around by the wind.

I watch an approaching helicopter fly into the stiff wind. It flies straight, but the pilot positions the aircraft at an angle for reasons I do not know – but it must be because of the wind. That stiff wind is also the resistance that comes with change – that resistance for maintaining the comfort of the status quo.

Whereas the wind provides resistance, it can also be directive. Like moving with ease when implementing an idea. Who doesn’t like the wind at their back? That wind also allows us to float with ease – but to some, it can be like riding a wild bull.

From causing leaves to rustle, flags to flutter and refreshing our skin, the wind is poetic – it’s moving – it provides imagery to us all. The wind can be soft or rough – fierce or gentle – hot or cold – damaging or refreshing while delivering a variety of messages. Yet, the wind is free – free to do as it wants – even imposing its will.

Wind – that natural flow of atmospheric gases along the Earth’s surface – simply, the movement of air.

Wind – that force moving sand along the beach, changing the landscape, or eroding stone.

Other planets have winds, but solar winds are not the movement of gases.

Wind – a key component of song and movie titles as Gone with the Wind, Inherit the Wind, Blowin’ in the Wind, Candle in the Wind, Ride Like the Wind, They Call the Wind Mariah, Colors of the Wind, and many more.

Wind – a necessity for recreation as moving sailboats, flying kites, windsurfing, hand gliding, paragliding, and more.

Although the wind can be many things, the wind on the beach can provide a freshness that only the winds of the sea provide. The wind can be one of the reasons why walking the beach is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 412

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No concert this weekend. Actually, the next artist taking the stage must change due to unforeseen extenuating circumstances. James Brown (the Godfather of Soul) will be rescheduled. Next up: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Journey. Date TBA (possibly 28th Sept).

This weekend our handbell choir starts the season with a fun rendition of Children of the Heavenly Father. For those interested, listen to a studio recording here.

Benevolent Impalers (my football fantasy team) rolled to 2-0 record with a convincing victory over a personal rival (a friend since my first day in college) who is also a perennial power in this league. I remained cautiously concerned because no team has ever made the playoffs with only two wins.

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Allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh recently surfaced. Contrary to many others, I refuse to judge the man on the merits of college-days behavior.

Although I haven’t watched any of the Democratic debates to date, plus I don’t plan on watching any in the future, columnist Maureen Dowd (New York Times) offers this interesting perspective.

Not only does President Trump wants to ease air quality standards, he wants to block states from setting clean air standards. Hmmmm …. Seems the Republican call for “States Rights” is not surprisingly silent.

An obvious contradiction. Polls show that Americans want fuel-efficient vehicles. Yet, in practice, Americans purchase many large SUVs and trucks. Wonder how that correlates with partisan voting.

How’s this for logic? Socialism offers free health care for all. Joseph Stalin was a Socialist. Stalin killed millions. Say no to Medicare for All.

To lead you into this week’s satirical headlines, The Onion provides a timeline of capital punishment in America.

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Weekly Headlines from The Onion (combos welcome)

Huge box of extra organs left on curb outside hospital
Adoption agency gives couple who waited long time an extra kid free of charge
“Flatbread means pizza,” man explains to visiting father
Nike recalls sweat-wicking shirts that pull gallons liquid directly from wearers’ bodies
Philadelphia to become DirectTV, Pennsylvania after cream cheese manufacturer loses naming rights
Grizzled beer can used as ashtray watches another headstrong 12-pack come and go through patio

(My Combo) Headstrong grizzled man waited long time to pull extra cream cheese from huge box

Interesting Reads

Spreading misinformation
Why big data continues to get bigger
Losing at Waterloo
Why school buses are yellow
How Americans view China
(Graphic) World economy by countries on one chart
(Photos) EyeEm Photo Awards

To send you into the weekend, my favorite video by The Cars. R.I.P Rick Ocasek. In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On Murals of Belfast

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While cruising the British Isles in 2017, Belfast fascinated me. In my past post about Belfast, I opened the post with the following: Belfast, Northern Ireland is beautiful, interesting, and gut-wrenching – and we were only there for a part of one day. On one end is the natural beauty, architecture, vibrancy, and history – and the other end The Troubles – what the locals call the Northern Ireland Conflict (1968-1998).

Belfast, Northern Ireland has a history of conflict – especially in the past one hundred years. Many of us remember the conflict from fierce conflict that raged their land from the 1960s well into the 1990s – a conflict centered around politics and religion. Today, Belfast is a beautiful city. Yet, visitors who have a sense of history about The Troubles carry a strange and troubling feeling during their entire stay.

The Peace Wall that separates sectors of the city is anything but peaceful, while its stories feel like a punch in the gut. Beautiful murals are found throughout the city – but many are dedicated to the heroes of one side or the other. Others make political statements, and other commemorate battles or events.

I wanted to feature the murals, but do so got lost in the shuffle. So, I stumbled across what I do have when cleaning out the blog closet. Besides, Belfast’s murals would fascinate Resa.

The first is a different collection – especially when seeing their location (the last pic).

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Commercial Court is located in the part of the city known as the Cathedral Quarter. It’s a courtyard loaded with murals that included famous people. Enjoy the collection. Recognize anyone?

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Unfortunately, I didn’t capture many of the murals I saw around the city. For more information about Belfast’s murals, see the links below the video. They are fascinating, and not very subtle.

More Information

On a Beach Walk: No. 56 (Wisdom)

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I like walking the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Wisdom conjures many thoughts. What is wisdom? What does it mean to be wise? How do we become wise or achieve wisdom? How do we share wisdom? Does wisdom prevents us from seeing what needs to be seen? But it’s hard to imagine wisdom getting in the way. Regardless of the answers, there is no doubt that wisdom does not mean one as all the answers.

I think about how a baby transitions into a toddler.  The time from squirming to rolling over to  crawling to walking to running with accidents along the way. Isn’t wisdom similar? Doesn’t wisdom allow us to get our feet below us over time?

Looking at the transitions we go through in life – from the confined childhood to the pains of adolescence to the growth in adulthood to the resignation as we age. Think of all the wisdom gained during life. The mistakes that become experiences allowing us to be smarter today than yesterday as we turn the pages of life.

Gaining wisdom requires an awareness of the here and now that allows us to experience life and gain wisdom. But each of us do it differently because life affects us differently. Afterall, we range from the hard headed to the heavy hearted.

Every person is a collection of stories – some positive, others negative – a collection that we pass along through conversations at work, among friends, and within the family. A few people pass along their experiences through biographies. Others do so through a fictional book based on personal experiences or someone else’s life.

Experience is a history one shares with others – a history involving wisdom. However, humanity has a way of repeating the mistakes of others by proclaiming, “this is different.”

Experience allows us to deal with the unknown corner – to discover what’s around the corner or to avoid it – now that’s using wisdom!

Life has a way of slapping down past experiences with hopes of shedding a new light – a new way. After 12 years of teaching I discovered I had done a great job of doing it wrong. That internalization allowed me to step into a new frontier with confidence and gather new wisdom. At least I saw the light that the majority of my colleagues did not see – or chose to ignore it.

Wisdom – that process of thinking about our experiences, knowledge, understanding, and sensibility to make a choice.

Wisdom – the criss-crossing of interacting brain cells one uses for the betterment of both self and the many.

While much wisdom may comfort some, can wisdom get in the way? Can wisdom prevent us from seeing the reality or the vision? Experience and wisdom can block a fresh view – so we need someone to look at the situation through a different lens; a move that could move us to a different paradigm.

I look at the sea and wonder how many stories it holds. Then again, wisdom tells me that I’m thinking metaphorically.

Wisdom – something that comes from discernment while promenading the sand; after all, I like walking the beach for it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.