On Beach Walk #64 (Creativity)

Embed from Getty Images

 

I like walking the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

Creativity is a powerful word – so are related words create and creative. These words of similar meaning, but create is the verb, creativity the noun, and creative the adjective – but today I think of these words as a collective.

My first thought is about those creative with their hands – sowers, quilters, crafters, 3-dimensional artists as potters, sculptures, and others. Definitely not my strength, but these are skills that can be learned.

To some, creative people can draw and paint. Whereas some seem to be naturally gifted with this skill, but nope again, not my strength.

I think of an art teacher who once told me that anyone can learn to draw because there are four things to do – draw straight lines, draw curved lines, establish the proper proportions between them along with the correct angles. His words opened the world of drawing to me because I could now see the world through a different lens – a world that I did not know.

Did that improve my creativity? Oh yes, but I still don’t draw well because I didn’t practice, yet, there are times I look at something in terms of straight lines, curves, proportions, and angles – and yes – I see them!

One aspect of creativity is being able to think outside the box. A different way that others don’t. Now that I can do. Some see the solution as choice A, B, or a compromise of the two. The creative thinkers are the ones that find a new solution beyond those choices.

An architect told me that he has to have at least one architect in his office that is creative in his designs. Not necessarily abstract or modernistic looking – but one who finds a creative solution that meets the client’s wants and needs. A skill that not all architects have. But for those who have visited La Sagrada in Barcelona, Spain, Gaudi’s creativity is unique.

Sometimes architects are ahead of their time – but as time moves on, those designs transition into the mainstream. In some cases, even out of date.

Design engineers have to think ahead about future generations of their product. That would be true for a vacuum cleaner – but also for complex equipment as a jet engine. Creativity is an essential ingredient in innovation and improvement.

For scientists as Albert Einstein, Sir Isaac Newton, and countless others, they thought outside of the box to develop their laws and theories. In general, physicists have a knack for creative forward thinking.

Trade workers as carpenters and plumbers are always problem solving. They face problems on a daily basis requiring a creative solution – and they seem to do it.

The creativity of musicians is impressive. Mozart’s composed music with many notes that can be too busy for some to hear. Think about how many types, styles, and genres of music humanity has created through the creativity of creative musicians.

Creativity is also a gift for writers and poets. A creativity they share through the novels, short stories, poems, and more.

Let us not forget nature’s creativity. It’s changing shapes and designs to optimize efficiency. The designs in shapes and colors seen in the shells on the beach that I walk. The creative ways different organisms capture food. After all, not all beaks and bills of birds are the same because they are specialized for different purposes. Yes, nature’s creativity at work.

All of us have a creative side – but do we use it? Do we develop it? Do we recognize the creativity of others?

Unlike the beach that I walk, creativity has no boundaries. Nonetheless, I enjoy walking the beach because it is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

On an Edible Color Palette

Life is like a jar of jellybeans – It doesn’t matter what you’re gonna get – they all taste good.  (Vishal Singh)
I would love to meet J.K. Rowling and tell her how much I admire her writing and am amazed by her imagination. I read every ‘Harry Potter’ book as it came out and looked forward to each new one. I am rereading them now with my kids and enjoying them every bit as much. She made me look at jelly beans in a whole new way. (Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO)
You can tell a lot about a fellow’s character by his way of eating jellybeans. (Ronald Reagan, former US President)
Yes, this Explore is about jelly beans. This is not a musical tribute to them, but a very interesting less-than-4-minute report I saw on CBS Sunday Morning earlier this year. Watch and enjoy.

On a Dollop of Dali

Artist Salvadore Dali is known as a brilliant artist, yet (arguably) his personality was as complex as his art. Some say vain, others say eccentric Some say narcissistic, others say brilliant. Some say difficult, and others simply say all the listed and more.

I am not strange. I am just not normal. (Salvador Dali)

Give me two hours a day of activity, and I’ll take the other twenty-two in dreams. (Salvador Dali)

The secret of my influence has always been that it remained secret. (Salvador Dali)

Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings. (Salvador Dali)

Have no fear of perfection – you’ll never reach it. (Salvador Dali)

There is only one difference between a madman and me. The madman thinks he is sane. I know I am mad. (Salvador Dali)

On the Artist’s Mind

The past December I searched for a new header for this blog, and readers kindly gave me opinions on the choices I provided. Besides giving the paper some pop, I picked my current header because it is full of life and resembled a vibrant tangle of brain neurons.

Before the input, I favored the one below, and it still intrigues me. Although artists say something in their works, they place greater emphasis on what the viewer sees. Before reading more, pause to stare and think: What do you see in this image? I’ll say more below.

free_header_boat

Besides fitting the site’s color scheme, in this picture I saw aspects of my own life: a thinker, but one at peace; an independent mind away from the masses, to see a different way; a contrarian nature.

Comments on the post and conversations with friends brought for a wide range of thoughts: the thinker, dark, and lost hope. A friend noted the slumped shoulders, no oars, and no signs of motion – signifying lost and going nowhere.
 
So, the next time you find yourself wondering what the originator was saying, don’t be like me trying to figure out the original thought; but concentrate on what you see and think while understanding that someone else has a totally different impression.

Please add your comments on the boat image.

The image is courtesy of Mr. Doubts.