On a Message of Power

This is the second in a 3-part post. For those seeing this for the first time, here’s Part 1.

Let us be confident in approaching the throne of grace that we shall have mercy from him and find grace when we are in need of help. Hebrews 4: 16

Other References

Prayer and the power of prayer are aspects of living religiously. Prayer is a trust in God and his ways. Through prayer we receive God’s grace, mercy, joy, freedom, guidance, and peace. Biblically, the gospels have many accounts of Jesus praying, and the apostle Paul always wrote to those who were in needs, thus encouraged power.

This story, one involving my prayers and faith, demonstrated how God acts through the power of prayer. Although 20+ years have passed, the message is timeless.

In January 1968 doctors diagnosed my mother with liver cancer. This was her second round with cancer as she had a mastectomy several years earlier. Through her battle she fought like I never imagined. She took all the treatments and all their side effects; she demonstrated an unbelievable courage.

Because of the physical distance between myself and my parents, I was removed from the struggle; therefore I didn’t understand the day-to-day problems. While I called, visited, encouraged, and prayed, I realized the terminal effect of liver cancer. Through my prayers I continually asked for strength for all of us.

My parents used Florida for its weather and medical facilities, and I knew her June 1987 trip back to Ohio would be her last. On August 20th at 4:30 a.m. I received a call from Dad saying they were off to the hospital. Knowing that she had been declining, I began a series of 2 ½-hour journeys to the hospital. With each trip I could see her declining condition. Prayers became more frequent and more intense; and I started feeling the effects of my efforts.

It was her seventh day in the hospital. As I left the hospital to return home, I realized the next time I would see her, she would be gone from us. The long drive home was filled with even deeper prayer as I asked for three things: continued strength, for no more suffering for her, and for her not to be taken from us while I was on the road. I left the hospital at 4:30 pm, arrived home at 7:00 pm, and received the call at 10:00 pm.

After discussions and some consoling with my wife, I began the necessary phone calls. In the one to my pastor I shared a personal thought I had through prayer while at her beside that day. He reassured me of that thought, and then I stated, “I might share that with others at the funeral.”

I obviously didn’t sleep much that night. Yes, I was also thinking of what I would say to those attending the funeral service. I had many glorious thoughts in my mind, but not on paper. A tremendous sermon was mentally created and never to be repeated again.

The Thursday trip to my hometown was also full of thoughts; thoughts of joy and sorrow that brought tears to my eyes. I kept thinking about what I was going to say and became preoccupied with my desires. Yes, continually praying for the right words to say and the strength to say them.

Friday I saw her in the casket for the first time and realized that speaking at the service was asking too much of myself. Through several long discussions with the local pastor I shared my stories and thoughts. While admitting to him that my expectations were probably too high, he reassured be that he would deliver my themes in his message.

Through prayer I didn’t give up hope of being able to accomplish my mission. Many of the long Saturday visitation hours were taken in deep thought by asking for strength from God through the beautiful flowers, the people visiting, and through Mom.

Sunday morning came a great revelation – Write out those words, thus if I couldn’t read them, the pastor would! Through the Sunday morning service, readings, and sermon I found new strength, and the pen moved quickly; especially considering I’m not very good with Bible references.

Nobody in my family knew of my desires. As my wife saw me writing, she realized I was up to something, so I told her what I was doing, my arrangement with the pastor, and asked her for her support and confidence.

Later in the day I shared the written message with others. The pastor said, “And you think you can read this?” My closest hometown friend who had recently and unexpectedly lost his father said I wouldn’t have the strength to do it. A cousin, also a pastor, read it and his only commented, “You won’t be able to do it.” I told each of these people that I realized that I probably couldn’t, but I had to try. Later that night, I asked Dad’s permission to speak at the funeral, and he granted without knowing anything about my message.

That night was one of little sleep as the mind couldn’t relax. I arose early and was never able to read through the message without crying. The final moments at the funeral home were difficult and my wife kept saying “Don’t do it” as I’m sure she didn’t want me to humiliate myself. I always responded by saying that I’ll make my decision right before my time in the service.

As the funeral service went on, I began to feel a new inner strength. I knew I was going to do it. At the stated time, I went to the pulpit and told the people that if I couldn’t continue, the pastor would deliver my message.

I continued to speak with an unbelievable calm that was filled with confidence. Not once did I shed a tear or stammer my words. I made it through every difficult passage. I felt unbelievably strong. At the end, I shook the pastor’s hand and said, “I did it” and then began to cry as I returned to my seat. God gave me great strength for a given situation, and then quickly pulled the plug on my adrenalin.

I soon regained my composure, and my wife simply smiled. I felt great, comfortable, and so at peace. The last part of the service, the ride to the cemetery, the graveside rites, and the time thereafter were easy. I had then, and still have today, such a great calm.

When I returned to work, many co-workers expressed their sorrow and concern. Without telling my story, I told them of my great peace, yet they looked perplexed.

Throughout my life I’ve prayed from many things: a lower heating bill, more time on task, a sports win, or something at work. All important at the time for some reason, but I never prayed for anything as I did on this occasion. My success this time had to be due to what I was praying for and my continual, deep-spiritual approach.

The following Bible passages support my experiences and beliefs.

What did I say at the funeral? Click here.

On an Ice Legend

Many of us recognize Scott Hamilton, the professional figure skater. Most of us remember Scott Hamilton the Olympian. I’m one of the much smaller number who was fortunate to see him skate during his teen years.

I attended (and am a proud graduate of) Bowling Green State University. Scott grew up at Bowling Green as his adopted father was a biology professor at the university. And yes, Dr. Hamilton was one of my professors for a portion of freshman biology.

As an avid Falcon hockey fan, we were treated (between periods, once a year) to a skating exhibition by a young townie who had won many competitions. Yes, that was my introduction to Scott Hamilton; so it’s been a pleasure following his career.

Recently I saw an interview with Scott on the Today show as he’s promoting his new book: The Great Eight: How to be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to be Miserable). We know Olympic Gold Metal winner, the skating commentator, and professional performer, but Scott Hamilton faced medical obstacles throughout his life. Yet he remains positive and full of life.

He focuses the book on the eight secrets for dealing with challenges. I haven’t read the book, but this is a great interview with a positive message and also humor. If the book is anything like his personality, it’s got to be a great read.

Here are three links: the Today show interview (7 minutes), a written interview from years ago at the Academy of Achievement, and the book on Amazon.