On Aesop’s Tale of the Fractured Son

Fractured

Fractured Fairy Tales and Aesop & Sons were two segments on various versions of Rocky and Bullwinkle. They presented fairy tales or fables in a humorous, modernized manner while altering the storyline.

Commonalities

Debuted in 1959 on ABC’s Rocky & His Friends (The first of the Rocky & Bullwinkle show titles)

Produced by Jay Ward

Became part of The Hoppity Hooper Show in 1964

Became part of the Dudley Do-Right Show in 1969

Did not spinoff into books or comics

 

Fractured Fairy Tales

Fractured Fairy Tales had three different introductions

Produced by Jay Ward

Narrated by Edward Everett Horton

Voices by June Foray, Bill Scott, Paul Frees, and an uncredited Daws Butler

91 episodes were made; first – Goldilocks; Last – The Youth Who Set Out to Learn What Fear Was (Click for episode list)

Each episode 4½ minutes long

One of the few TV cartoon series with no continuing characters,

Enjoy the Three Little Pigs

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Aesop and Son

Same theme music as Fractured Fairy Tales

Structure: Aesop attempting to teach a lesson to his son using a fable. After carefully listening to the story, the son undermines the moral with a pun.

Continuing Tag Line: ..and do you know the moral of the story?

39 episodes: First – The Lion and the Mouse; Last – The Fox and the Three Weasels (Click for episodes list)

Voices: Aesop by Charles Ruggles (the only Jay Ward character he did), Junior by Daws Butler

Here’s an episode: The Fox and the Winking Horse

On Ruff and Reddy

This one may be new to most readers, but this may be the first cartoon series I can recall watching. The words to sing along are below the video, so scroll down before playing the theme song to Ruff and Reddy.


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Get set, get ready,
Here come Ruff and Reddy.
They’re tough, but steady,
Always rough and ready.

They sometimes have their little spats,
Even fight like dogs and cats,
But when they need each other,
That’s when, they’re rough and ready.

Characters
Ruff, a straight and smart cat; Reddy, a dumb and stupid dog

Villains: “Scary” Harry Safari, Captain Greedy and Salt Water Daffy; and Killer and Diller

Ruff and Reddy, plus Professor Gizmo meeting aliens from Muni-Mula (a strange planet of metal) is their most memorable episode

Muni-Mula is (“aluminum” spelled backward)

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The Show
Created by Hanna-Barbera, and their first production

Ruff, voiced by Don Messick with a similar voice he would later use for Pixie the mouse

Reddy, voiced by Daws Butler with this southern draw later becoming the voice of Huckleberry Hound

The show featured a live action host/emcee (Jimmy Blaine), and the episodes had a narrator (Don Messick)

In the show (but between cartoon episodes), Puppeteers Rufus Rose and Bobby Nicholson provided comedic relief as Rhubarb the Parrot and Jose the Toucan.

For those needing more Muni-Mula

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Production
NBC originally broadcasted Ruff and Reddy in black and white in December 1957 on NBC

3 seasons, 156 episodes

First: Planet Pirates (Dec 14 1957)

Last: Have Blop Will Travel (Feb 4, 1960)

The episodes were not much longer than four minutes, including an opening song and much repetition of preceding events.

There were 13 episodes in each of the 12 stories of the serials

The show’s episodes borrowed from the serialized storytelling format of such shows as Crusader Rabbit that used episodes with cliffhanger storylines

Although NBC cancelled the show after 1959-1960, they revived the show the spring of 1962 with Captain Bob Cottle as the host

NBC cancelled the series in September 1964

Additional FYI
Ruff and Reddy was translated into other languages: Jambo & Ruivão (Brazilian Portuguese), Pouf & Riqui (French), Ruff e Reddy (Italian),  Жолтко и Лутко (Zoltko i Lutko) (Macedonian), Ruff y Reddy (Spanish), Ruff och Reddy (Swedish), つよいぞラフティ (Japanese), Ralofo le Rali (Tswana)

Dell Comics published 12 issues of Ruff & Reddy (1958-1962)

Here’s another episode, but without Muni-Mula, enjoy The Long Gone Leprechaun

On One Smart Bear

Sing along with his best known theme song. For those that don’t know the words, here ya go.

Yogi Bear is smarter than the average bear,
Yogi Bear is always in the ranger’s hair.
At a picnic table you will find him there
Stuffing down more goodies than the average bear.

He will sleep till noon but before it’s dark,
He’ll have every picnic basket that’s in Jellystone Park.

Yogi has it better than a millionaire
That’s because he’s smarter than the average bear.


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Many may not know that the above wasn’t original theme song … but this one is

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Yogi Bear is #36 on TV Guide’s Greatest Cartoon Characters of All-Time (Personally, he should be higher)

Created by William Hanna, Joseph Barbera, Ed Benedict

First voiced by Daws Butler

Yogi Bear featured in 10 shows, 13 films and specials, 10 video games, 88 comic books, and, comic strip (1961-19880 created by Gene Hazelton

He made his debut in 1958 as a supporting character in The Huckleberry Hound Show

Three years later (January 1961), The Yogi Bear Show debuts, which included segments Snagglepuss, Fibber Fox, Yakky Doodle and Chopper

Lives in Jellystone Park

Characters include Boo-Boo Bear (best friend), Ranger Smith (rival/friend), and Cindy Bear (girlfriend)

First appearance in his own show: watch Yogi Bear’s Big Break

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Yogi’s personality and mannerisms were based on Art Carney’s Ed Norton character on The Honeymooners

A musical animated feature film, Hey There, It’s Yogi Bear!, produced in 1964.

Yogi by the Ivy Three (1960), sung in a voice mimicking Yogi Bear, and reached reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 (must have been a slow music period)

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Speech
Often speaks in rhyme

Often uses puns in his speech

Has a habit of pronouncing large words with a long vocal flourish

Yogisms

  • pic-a-nic baskets
  • Pic-a-nic baskets may be delicious on the lips, but they’re a lifetime on the hips.
  • I’m smarter than the av-er-age bear!
  • Hello, Mr. Ranger, sir!
  • Hey there, Boo Boo!
  • I’m so smart that it hurts.
  • What do we do, Boo-Boo?
  • A genius never questions his instincts, Boo-Boo. When you have a mind like mine, you can’t blink or you’ll put a kink in your think!
  • I’m hungrier than the average bear. I wish I could find a bush that tasted like birthday cake!

Yogi Bear: [On the Ranger’s phone] Hello? Hello? Is this the White House?
Ranger Smith: Yogi!
Yogi Bear: Hey, the President knows my name.

Ranger Smith: [showing a “Do Not Feed The Bears” sign to Yogi] Read this sign.
Yogi Bear: [deliberately reading incorrectly] Uh, “No Smoking In The Forest”?

Here are two tributes to Yogi Bear

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Meanwhile, it’s time for me to take a break. See you in a few … and hopefully not too long. Be safe, be well, do good work, and hope to see you soon.