Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 174

On Politics
The Republican Party releases a major report about ways they can compete in 2016. All is join and dandy in print, but in reality, as long as organizations as Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) keeps trotting people like Sarah Palin, Michelle Bachmann, and Donald Trump in front of the cameras, welcome to reality.

Thanks to The Onion: Authorities on alert as hundreds of crazed psychopaths enter Congressional chambers

Most people know that history comes in several forms. For instance, the US Revolutionary War from the US perspective probably differs from the British perspective. Well, when it comes to the US Constitution, we now have the Texas Republican Party perspective, which is also lawmakers are pushing into Texas schools. For evidence, this will introduce you to Texas’ newest senator – ladies and gentlemen – Mr. Ted Cruz.

James Madison, the Father of the US Constitution, had a recent birthday (March 16th). Here’s some interesting tidbits about him.

Republicans criticizing President Obama for waiting so long to visit Israel is funny because they don’t realize the past history of Republican presidents.

I’m not a Bill O’Reilly fan, but cheers to him for blasting Rep. Michelle Bachmann (R-MN).

On This Week’s Headlines from The Onion
Cruel owner chains bike outside in freezing weather
Groundhog beheaded for inaccurate prediction
FDA relaxes definition of Smoothie
Baseball star David Ortiz listed as season to season
NASA designers release 50 new space skirts
Boss gets on man’s ass about finishing NCAA bracket
Another job interview ruin as sutures popping open during handshake

Interesting Reads
About wine ratings
Are polar bears really disappearing?
Why ballroom beats the treadmill
Respites and autism from M3 Red, someone we see here at times
Darwin’s observations on biogeography
Stephen King (author and gun owner) on gun control
Lina and the Wolf: A book review about a Prokofiev and his soprano wife
Can man survive on beer alone?

On Potpourri
Cheers to Robin (Life in the Bogs) as she moves to a new location – Breezes at Dawn. Besides being a good photographer and one who finds the right words for the photographic moments, I’m confident that she’s also – and most importantly – a good person. Visit her new location and if you are new, tell her I sent you.

This week’s post On a Coin Analogy received interesting comments. On a related note, I appreciate these words by Dennis Vemena:

In common English usage, “theory” means something like “guess” or “hunch”. It means something speculative, uncertain. In science, however, the meaning is almost exactly the opposite. In science, a theory is an idea that has stood the test of time. This difference between the common usage and the scientific usage of the word is a frequent source of confusion for nonscientists. In science, a theory is a well-tested idea – an explanatory framework that makes sense of the current facts available, and continues to make accurate predictions about the natural world.

It’s college basketball March Madness in the US, which means my alma mater continues having the 12th longest streak in the country of not participating. How’s this for a catchy marketing phrase: Bowling Green Falcon Basketball – not since 1968

On the SEC getting only 3 teams in the tournament: “This is a BSC league … that shouldn’t happen! (Tennessee Head Coach Cuonzo Martin). Coach Martin, good job at identifying the problem because the BSC is about football, not basketball.

The University of Kentucky didn’t (and thankfully so) make the tournament. Hey UK – sell yourself to the devil in favor of winning at all costs, things like this happen. How many of your recruits the past four years are on target to graduate? Answer – not many!

I will feature another classic cartoon character on Saturday.

Readers surprised with the amount of praise for last Monday Morning’s Entertainment post of Donald O’Conner. To send you into the weekend, enjoy Gene Kelly’s famous bit from the same movie: Singin’ in the Rain. Have a good weekend! In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On the Wall

Where in the Constitution is separation of church and state? There is no such thing … I mean it just doesn’t exist in America for a purpose, because we are a Christian nation.” – Christine O’Donnell

Although Christine O’Donnell said these words, she is not the lone voice regarding this matter. Her quote represents an example of the Tea Party’s affinity for revisionist history made to accommodate both political and religious ideologies.

First, these ideological zealots are correct – “separation of church and state” is not directly in the Constitution; however US Supreme Court, through its Constitutional powers, first applied the phrase in Reynolds vs. United States (98 US 154, 1878) and mentioned the phrase over 20 times ever since.

Secondly, since we hear Tea Party candidates frequently proclaiming the intent of our Founding Fathers, I thought it was time to research this group. Some were public about their religion while others were private. The vast majority were Protestant and Episcopalians, with the remaining being Roman Catholic, Unitarians, Dutch Reformed, Congregationalists, and even a variety of skeptics. Since many regard James Madison as the Father of the US Constitution, I set out to discover his view of the First Amendment, thus include some of his quotes below.

“Because we hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, “that religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.”

“The Religion then of every man must be left to the conviction and conscience of every man; and it is the right of every man to exercise it as these may dictate.”

“This right is in its nature an unalienable right. It is unalienable, because the opinions of men, depending only on the evidence contemplated by their own minds cannot follow the dictates of other men: It is unalienable also, because what is here a right towards men, is a duty towards the Creator.”

“Religion be exempt from the authority of the Society at large, still less can it be subject to that of the Legislative Body.”

“Whilst we assert for ourselves a freedom to embrace, to profess and to observe the Religion which we believe to be of divine origin, we cannot deny an equal freedom to those whose minds have not yet yielded to the evidence which has convinced us.”

“Are the Quakers and Mennonites the only sects who think a compulsive support of their Religions unnecessary and unwarrantable? can their piety alone be entrusted with the care of public worship? Ought their Religions to be endowed above all others with extraordinary privileges by which proselytes may be enticed from all others? We think too favorably of the justice and good sense of these denominations to believe that they either covet pre-eminences over their fellow citizens or that they will be seduced by them from the common opposition to the measure.”

“Because finally, “the equal right of every citizen to the free exercise of his Religion according to the dictates of conscience” is held by the same tenure with all our other rights.”

Let us not forget these Thomas Jefferson words in the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

Let us not forget that James Madison wrote these words in 1785, four years before our new nation submitted the Constitution to the states for ratification.

Let us also not forget that at the time of the Constitution’s ratification, several states had state-established churches.

Let us not forget that the US Supreme Court (in Reynolds) quoted Jefferson’s letter for the Danbury Baptist, who the state jailed for illegal preaching that was against the state-sponsored religion.

Let us not forget that In God We Trust first appeared on coins in 1864 as the country faced rebuilding from the Civil War; and the phrase didn’t appear on paper currency until 1957.

Let us not forget that Congress adopted In God We Trust as our country’s official motto in 1956.

Let us not forget that One nation under God was first used in our Pledge of Allegiance in 1948 and officially added in 1954.

Let us not forget that the 1950s marked a time when the world faced growing concerns about Communism.

Let us not forget that in this election season and beyond, that history can help us protect us from revisionists who seek to force their values on everyone.