On Paris in Cincinnati

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This post is one that I’ve wanted to do for many years. As part of my cleaning out the blog closet project, I had to remove the thought from my mind. Although I’ve taken the Paris-Cincinnati flight several times, I’ve never visited the City of Lights. Surely I have to get there someday.

Meanwhile, this will have to do because Paris is alive and well in Cincinnati. In no way am I comparing the two cities, but a touch of Paris is in my area – and some close to my residence. To rid this blog idea from my mind, I got images from elsewhere, but I have visited these locations.

Paris 1900: City of Entertainment was a temporary exhibit at the Cincinnati Art Museum in early 2019. For whatever reason, I didn’t attend, but you can see the exhibit by clicking here. Meanwhile, onto the tour.

 

Kings Island is an amusement park located away from the city center northeast of downtown Cincinnati. Opening in 1971, its Eiffel Tower (one-third of the size of the original) serves as an iconic landmark that is easily visible by motorists driving by on I-71. When I first came to the area, I could see the tower and the nightly fireworks from my balcony. Today, I can still hear them in the distance. Kings Island is also a popular destination for roller coaster enthusiasts.

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Chateau Laroche is also known as Loveland Castle. Don’t you think it has a French look? This unique structure is built on the banks of the Little Miami River. Amazingly, one person (Harry Andrews) built it from stones he carried from the river over 50+ years to create this place based on a castle in southern France. Upon his death, Andrews donated the castle to his Boy Scout troop – Knights of the Golden Trail. Of course, the castle is open to the public. Here’s the website.

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St. Mary’s Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington, Kentucky (directly across the Ohio River from downtown Cincinnati) is a stunning must-see for visitors to the area. I’ve never been to the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris (and given the fire, I may never). However, the Covington Basilica gives me the feel of what it may be like, but on a much smaller scale.

Dedicated in 1901, the outer west face is an exact copy of the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris and the inside is stunning. Below are two resources to learn and see more

Hope you enjoyed this Paris-Cincinnati connection.

On Local Cubans

Marc (@Sorryless) loves Cuban sandwiches so much, he’s on infinite quest to find his favorite Cuban. As part of his mission, he is willing to travel miles and miles – and even posts about his ventures.

Whether I suggested or it, he was interested in my thoughts about his beloved sandwich in my area, I decided to jump into the fray. Locating nearby establishments was easy – so was trying them – but getting around to writing a post about them was difficult.  With all due respect to Marc, I had to do something!

I present the candidates.

Sharonville Depot Deli

Grilled Cuban – Ham & smoked grilled pork with bread and butter pickles, Muenster cheese, and Dijon mustard on Ciabatta

Lyle’s Trailside

Lyle’s BBQ Cuban – Pulled pork topped with shaved ham, melted provolone, mustard and pickles

Oasis Golf & Conference Center

Cuban Panini – Shaved ham and sliced pork loin with  brown mustard, pickles & pepper jack  cheese. Served in a grilled panini

 

Final Word

Each of the Cubans have positives and negatives, so it comes down to personal preferences

  • The most-fresh tasting – Depot Deli
  • The most hearty – Oasis
  • Most BBQ tasting – Lyle’s Trailside
  • Best presentation – Depot Deli
  • Best accompanying side – Lyle’s Trailside
  • Most surprising – Oasis
  • If I had to pick just one – Depot Deli

For me, given the range of flavors in a Cuban, it’s about balance. One has to be able to taste all the flavors without one particular flavor being too dominant.

On a Walktober Town Walk

Loveland Sign

Loveland Sign

As part of Robin’s Walktober, welcome to Loveland, the town where my wife and I reside. Instead of sharing our beauty fall colors, I’ve chosen to take you for a town walk of this northeastern Cincinnati suburb.

Lt. Colonel Thomas Paxton may have first lived in a house like this …

Rich Cabin

Rich Cabin @ the Loveland Historical Museum

… but his daughter and husband built this home in 1840 …

White Pillars

White Pillars

… and all are buried in the family cemetery (both the home and cemetery are now part of a subdivision)

Paxton Cemetery

Paxton Family Cemetery

In the early days, Loveland thrived as a railroad community because two lines intersected here, thus served at least 14 trains a day … (and one railway still operates as I hear the train’s horn several times a day)

Loveland Station

Loveland Station

One of the railroad beds is now a very popular 70-mile bike trail, which also intersects with other trails in the state

Loveland straddles both sides the Little Miami River, which is a designated sceinic waterway at both the state and national level, thus is popular for canoeing … plus the bike trail follows the river

Between the bike trail and the river is a wonderful city park with picnic tables, an amphitheater, and access to the river bank

Old Town offers a some shops, eateries, and a movie theater that the local firefighters converted into a playhouse for the community theater company

Other sights include a studio for local artists, an old church that is now someone’s home (I’m told the owners call it their chouse), and even a mural for Resa

Loveland honors its veterans from all wars and area firefighters

The city’s motto is The Sweetheart of Ohio, besides, people love to send Valentine’s Day cards with the Loveland post office mark

A City Symbol

The Sweetheart of Ohio

From Loveland, Ohio, good day and good night … and don’t forget to vist

WalktoberRobin

On the Election and Student Drinking

I prepared a posting about Ohio as a swing state, but two articles in today’s Cincinnati Enquirer caught my interest this morning. So the swing state posting will wait until tomorrow.

In terms of my view of our presidential election, the blind faith of partisans drives me crazy. Citizens casting votes for reasons other than issues is pathetic. The continual lack of substance and sound-bite rhetoric from the candidates is insulting. For an independent moderate as myself, Washington Post columnist David Broder hit the nail on the head. Check it out.

The second involves a high school, an athlete, a parent, and drinking. Outcome of this case will impact the role of schools in their communities.

It seems local police caught an underage senior drinking and reported it to the school. After the school suspended the football player for four games, the parent filed a lawsuit seeking reinstatement through an injunction citing, “Senior year is a special time, and the football season does not go on forever.” The judge granted the preliminary injection and the case is off to the First District Court of Appeals.

Although the article begins by saying the student was suspended for drinking during the summer, it mentions only one date: September 2 (Tuesday) – the date police contacted the school. It did not mention the following (my discovery):

  • When the incident occurred
  • The first day of school (August 26th)
  • The first football game (August 22nd)
  • First day of football practice (sometime in early August)

Read for yourself.