On a Prize Ham

Sing along as the words are below the video!

Whose our favorite TV Star?
Who comes on with a wham?
Whose got the laughiest show by far?

(Porky) Porky Pig

Our favorite ham!

When the music starts
You wanna tap your toes
You feel like dancin’ a jig
Swing around in a circle and doe see doe
Time to watch Porky Pig!

Oh, tat’s Porky
Porky Pig
He’s the barnyard
Mr. Big!

Now promenade all around the room
And find yourself a good seat
The show’s a gonna be startin’ soon
Time to watch

Time to watch … Porky Pig

Background
Porky Pig is a long-time from Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies

Creators: Friz Freleng, Bob Clampett

Two of Freleng’s childhood classmates were nicknamed “Porky” and “Piggy”

Porky transitioned from a shy little boy to a slimmer adult

Bob Clampett permanently made Porky a young adult who was cuter, slimmer, smarter, and eventually less of a stutterer

Porky’s second outing, Gold Diggers of ’49 (1936), was also the first cartoon directed by Tex Avery

Originally voiced by Joe Dougherty (1935–1937)

Interestingly, Joe Dougherty had a natural stuttering problem, but producers replaced him with Mel Blanc because Dougherty’s uncontrollable stuttering increased production costs

Starting with the 24th film, Porky’s Duck Hunt (1937), Mel Blanc voiced voice Porky for over 50 years (1937–1989)

Filmography
He is the oldest continuing Looney Tunes character

Porky was once the star of the show before Bugs Bunny became the star …. even then, Porky continued to be popular

First appearance: I Haven’t Got a Hat (1935)
Last appearance: Muchos Locos (1966)

Porky Pig appeared in 153 cartoons during cartoon’s Golden Age

After debuting in 1935, 15-17 new shorts released each year (1936-1940). Production decrease to 12 (1941), 2-8 new releases (1942-1948), and then 1956 was the last year with more than 1 new release

Porky only has a minor role in his first film, but the fat little stuttering pig quickly became popular

Personal
Father is Phineas, but his mother is unnamed

Mild-mannered and shy personality

Personality allowed him to be a good straight-man for zany characters as Sylvester Pussycat, Charlie Dog, Daffy Duck, and/or Bugs Bunny

This short, but classic blooper, which is opposite to his screen personality, was made in 1938

Honors
Porky was ranked number 47 on TV Guide’s list of top 50 cartoon characters

Porky received only one Oscar nomination: The Swooner Crooner (1944)

Porky in Wackyland, a film that sends Porky on a quest to find the last of the surreal Dodos, was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry (2000)

Appearances
Regularly appeared with other Warner Brother stars in syndication

The Porky Pig Show, ran Saturday morning on ABC (1964 to 1967)

Porky Pig and Friends ran 1971-1990

Appeared in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Space Jam, and Back in Action

Porky’s own comic book ran from 1942-62, was revived in ’65 by Gold Key Comics, and continued until 1984

Appeared in Dell Comics’ Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies Comics until 1962

In his share of video games and on a variety of lunch boxes and T-shirts

His most well-known signature line is this classic

On the Greatest Hour

How many of the characters in the line can you name? The words to sing along are below the video.

Overture, curtain, lights!
This is it. The night of nights.
No more rehearsing or nursing a part.
We know every part by heart!

Overture, curtain, lights!
This is it. We’ll hit the heights!
And oh, what heights we’ll hit!
On with the show, this is it!

Tonight what heights we’ll hit!
On with the show, this is it!”

Timeline
The roots to this show started October 11, 1960 (a Tuesday night) when The Bugs Bunny Show premiering on ABC

The show originally composed of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons produced between August 1948 and December 1969

General Foods originally sponsored the show

In August 1962, ABC moved The Bugs Bunny Show to Saturday, but it was moved to Sunday morning in September 1967

In September 1968, moved to CBS which combined it with The Road Runner Show to make The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

Behind the scenes

  • Directed by Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson
  • Voices by Mel Blanc, June Foray, Stan Freberg, Hal Smith
  • Music Theme by Mack David and Jerry Livingston

Lineup
Here’s the lineup, which are also linked to their post. Which did you visit?

Cultural Influence

Show’s Closing

On a Foghorn Reprise

With his classic, That’s a joke… I say, that’s a joke son, plus numerous one-liners, Foghorn Leghorn is one of my favorite classics. As a matter of fact, he was an early honoree here, but that was before I developed the format I now use. With that in mind, it’s time to give him this overdue honor!

Background
A large, friendly rooster with an overbearing personality

Created by Robert McKimson

Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons for Warner Brothers

Original based on The Sheriff, a West Coast radio character, but after the growing popularity of Senator Claghorn, a classic radio character on the nationally syndicated Fred Allen Show, Foghorn followed Claghorn’s character

Original voice by Mel Blanc (1946-1987), followed by 9 others

Starred in 28 cartoons between 1946 and 1963
First: Walky Talky Hawky (August 31, 1946)
Last: Banty Raids (1963)

Walky Talky Hawky nominated for Academy Award, but lost to Tom and Jerry’s The Cat Concerto

Made a cameo in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and Space Jam (1996)

Appeared in commercials for GEICO, KFC, Oscar Meyer Hotdogs

Personal
Loves to hum Camptown Races, but only knew the words “Duh dah, Duh dah”

Appears with Henery Hawk – a young chickenhawk who usually is seen looking for a chicken to eat, but doesn’t know what a chicken looks like

Dog nemesis is Barnyard Dog (aka George P Dog)

Also appeared with Barnyard Cat, Bill the Weasel, Poppy and Elvis (Enjoy this classic rant with Barnyard Cat

In attempting to woo the widowed Miss Prissy, he babysits her son, Egghead Jr

Moves around a lot – one address is Cucamonga, California where he received a telegram from Rhode Island Red, but also flies south of the “Masie-Dixie Line” to get “out of the deep freeze and into the deep south”

Went to Chicken Tech and with his chum, Rhode Island Red

Grandfather to Feather Buster

Classic Quotes
Foghorn Leghorn has many classic one liners … enjoy the video with a collection, as well as the list below.

Okay, I’ll shut up. Some fellas have to keep their tongues flappin’ but not me. I was brought up right. My pa used to tell me to shut up and I’d shut up. I wouldn’t say nothin’. One time darn near starved to death. Wouldn’t tell him I was hungry.

Boys as sharp as a bowling ball.

Pay attention, boy!

Boy’s like a dead horse — got no get-up-and-go.

That boy’s as strong as an ox, and just about as smart.

That boy’s like a tattoo … gets under your skin.

Go away boy. Ya bother me.

This is gonna cause more confusion than a mouse in a burlesque show!

You’re doing a lot of choppin’, but no chips are flyin’. I’m cuttin’ but you’re not bleedin’!

Clunk enough people and we’ll have a nation of lumpheads.

Aaaaaahhhhh, shuuutupp!!

Nice girl, but about as sharp as a sack of wet mice.

That womans as cold as a nudist on an iceberg.

She reminds me of Paul Revere’s ride – a little light in the belfry.

Gal reminds me of the highway between Ft. Worth and Dallas – no curves.

Boy’s like a dead horse – got no get up and go.

That kid’s about as sharp as a pound of wet liver.

If kid don’t stop talkin’ so much he’ll get his tongue sunburned.

That dog’s as subtle as a hand grenade in a barrel of oat meal.

Look sister, is any of this filtering through that little blue bonnet of yours?

I’ve got this boy as figgity as a bubble dancer with a slow leak.

You look like two miles of bad road.

I-I-I know what you’re gonna say son. When two halves is gone there’s nuthin’ left – and you’re right. It’s a little ol’ worm who wasn’t there. Two nuthins is nuthin’. That’s mathematics son. You can argue with me but you can’t argue with figures. Two half nuthins is a whole nuthin’.

Enjoy the full episode of PoP Goes the Weasel (1953)

On the Greatest

Thanks to Rich for the above
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Notables
Bugs Bunny is a cultural icon

According to NPR, Bugs has appeared in more films (both short and feature-length) than any other cartoon character and is the ninth most-portrayed film personality in the world

A Wild Hare (1940) received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Short Film

Since his debut, Bugs only appeared only in color Merrie Melodies films

Bugs only appearance in a black-and-white Looney Tunes film is a cameo in Porky Pig’s Feat (1943)

Bugs did not star in a Looney Tunes film until that series made its complete conversion to only color cartoons (1944)

The first cartoon character honored on a U.S. postage stamp

On December 10, 1985, Bugs received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Ranked #1 in TV Guide’s 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time (2002)

His stock…has never gone down…Bugs is the best example…of the smart-aleck American comic. He not only is a great cartoon character, he’s a great comedian. He was written well. He was drawn beautifully. He has thrilled and made many generations laugh. He is tops. (A TV Guide editor on CNN)

Bugs cartoons are listed 34 times on The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes list of cartoons

Bugs also received an Oscar nomination for Hiawatha’s Rabbit Hunt (1942)

Because Hiawatha’s Rabbit Hunt didn’t win, What’s Cookin’ Doc? (1944) spoofed the Academy in which Bugs demands a recount by claiming “sa-bo-TAH-gee”

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Knighty Knight Bugs (1958) with a medieval Bugs trades battling Yosemite Sam and his fire-breathing dragon (which has a cold), won an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film

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Rabbit Fire, Rabbit Seasoning, and Duck! Rabbit, Duck! compose the “Rabbit Season/Duck Season” trilogy and are famous for originating the “historic” rivalry between Bugs and Daffy Duck

What’s Opera, Doc? (1957), casts Bugs and Elmer Fudd in a parody of Richard Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen, and the US Library of Congress (in 1992) deemed it “culturally significant”, thus selecting it for preservation in the National Film Registry

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Personal
Born July 27, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York below Ebbets Field (home of the Brooklyn Dodgers)

Characteristics include clever, trickster, flippant, and personable until you mess with me attitude (and this scene is one of my all-time favorites)
9

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A known traveler, but frequently making the wrong turn in Albuquerque

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Antagonists include Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, Willoughby the Dog, Marvin the Martian, Beaky Buzzard, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig,Tasmanian Devil, Gossamer, Cecil Turtle, Witch Hazel, Rocky and Mugsy, Wile E. Coyote, the Crusher, Gremlin, Count Blood Count and a host of others

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Bugs’ carrot-chewing standing position, is based a Clark Gable scene with Claudette Colbert in a scene from It Happened One Night

Bugs occasionally communicates with the audience to explain something to the audience, such as

  • Be with you in a minute, folks!
  • Feisty, ain’t they?
  • That happens to him all during the picture, folks.
  • Gee, ain’t I a stinker?
  • Of course you know, this means war!

The origin of a classic Bugs Bunny line

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Background
Happy Rabbit, though different looking and a forerunner to Bugs, first appears in Porky’s Hare Hunt (1938)

Created by the animators and staff of Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) with staff including Tex Avery, Robert McKimson, and Mel Blanc

Mel Blanc originated the Bugs Bunny’s voice

Debuted in A Wild Hare (July 27, 1940) featuring Elmer Fudd and Bugs in a hunter-tormentor relationship

A Wild Hare also debuted Bugs’ most famous catchphrase: “What’s Up Doc?”

First use of Bugs Bunny’s name on-screen is in Elmer’s Pet Rabbit (1941)

“Bugs” Bunny (quotation marks only used, on and off, until 1944)

168 cartoon shorts, most of which were directed by Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson and Chuck Jones

Buckaroo Bugs was Bugs’ first film in the Looney Tunes series

Last Golden Age appearance in False Hare (1964)

12 episodes have been banned because of political correctness

An interview Martha Goldman Sigall (at age 92 in June 2009) who worked at Leon Schlesinger’s Studios in 1939 when the studio created Bugs Bunny

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Beyond Cartoons
In the fall of 1960, ABC debuted the prime-time television program The Bugs Bunny Show

The Bugs Bunny Show (through different formats and titles) appeared on network television for 40 years

Bugs featured in various network television specials in the 1970s and 80s

Films include Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Box Office Bunny, and Space Jam

Because of an equal-time agreement between Warner Brothers and Disney, Bugs Bunny and Mickey Mouse always appeared together in Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Who Framed Roger Rabbit introduced Bugs’ girlfriend, Lola Bunny (see a tribute)

Bugs has also appeared in numerous video games
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Memorable Lines
My favorite when referring to politicians

A few other … do you remember any of these?

  • Don’t take life too seriously. You’ll never get out alive.
  • OOH! Look at four-legged airplane!
  • Carrots are devine… You get a dozen for a dime, It’s maaaa-gic!
  • Eeeeeeh, watch me paste that pathetic palooka with a powerful, pachydermous, percussionpitch.
  • Don’t think it hasn’t been a little slice of heaven…’cause it hasn’t!
  • Well, what did you expect in an opera? A happy ending?
  • Do you happen to know what the penalty is for shooting a fricaseeing rabbit without a fricaseeing rabbit license?
  • I wonder what the poor bunnies are doing this season?
  • Oh, well, we almost had a romantic ending!
  • My, I’ll bet you monsters lead innnnteresting lives.
  • Here I go with the timid little woodland creature bit again. It’s shameful, but…ehhh, it’s a living.
  • I bet you say that to all the wabbits.
  • For shame, doc. Hunting rabbits with an elephant gun. Why don’t you shoot yourself an elephant?
  • I know this defies the law of gravity, but I never studied law!
  • Eh, what’s up, doc?

On Beep Beep

Here’s one for the ages, so for those who don’t know the words, look below the video.

If you’re on the highway and Road Runner goes beep beep.
Just step aside or might end up in a heap.
Road Runner, Road Runner runs on the road all day.
Even the coyote can’t make him change his ways.

Road Runner, the coyote’s after you.
Road Runner, if he catches you you’re through.
Road Runner, the coyote’s after you.
Road Runner, if he catches you you’re through.

That coyote is really a crazy clown,
When will he learn he can never mow him down?
Poor little Road Runner never bothers anyone,
Just runnin’ down the road’s his idea of having fun.
Lyrics source: http://www.lyricsondemand.com

History
Created by Chuck Jones (Interview with him below) for Warner Brothers Merrie Melodies

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48 shorts (majority by Chuck Jones) with Wile E Coyote (his tribute here)

First: Fast and Furry-ous (Sept. 17, 1949)

Last: Sugar and Spies (1966) (directed by Robert McKimson)

Beep Prepared (1961) received an Academy Award nomination

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Additional TIdbits
Road Runner only vocalizes “Beep, Beep” by Paul Julian

#38 (with Wile E Coyote) on TV Guide’s list of 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters

Road Runner also known as Acceleratii incredibus, Velocitus tremenjus, Hot-roddicus supersonicus, Speedipus Rex, Velocitus delectiblus, Delicius delicius, Dig-outius tid-bittius, Tastyus supersonicus, Birdibus zippibus, Birdius high-ballius, Burnius-roadibus, Super-sonicus-tastius, Batoutahelius, Velocitus incalcublii, Digoutius-hot-rodis, Fastius tasty-us, Tid-bittius velocitus, Super-Sonnicus idioticus, Disappearialis quickius, Burn-em upus asphaltus, Semper food-ellus, Ultra-sonicus ad infinitum, Boulevardius-burnupius, Morselus babyfatius tastius, Geococcyx californianus

Road Runner cartoons follow the laws of cartoon physics

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See wonderful pics of a real road runner by visiting Cindy Knoke

The Road Runner Show aired on CBS from September 1966 to September 1968

Merged with The Bugs Bunny Show to create The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Hour (1968-1985)

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Comic history includes Dell Comics (1958-1962) and Gold Key (1966-1983)

Enjoy this tribute to Road Runner