On an Infinite Journey

Fractal – any of various extremely irregular curves or shapes for which any suitably chosen part is similar in shape to a given larger or smaller part when magnified or reduced to the same size (Merriam-Webster)

Fractal – a never-ending pattern. Fractals are infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across different scales. They are created by repeating a simple process over and over in an ongoing feedback loop. Driven by recursion, fractals are images of dynamic systems – the pictures of Chaos. (The Fractal Foundation)

All created forms are fractal, as is their purpose, use, and allotted time for existence. (Guy Finley, writer)

The universe is fractal. The closer you look at it, the more interesting it becomes. (John Lloyd, producer)

Fractal geometry is everywhere, even in lines drawn in the sand. It’s the cycle of life… You see fractals in plants, in flowers. Within the human lung are branches within branches. (Ron Eglash, scientist)

Enjoy this visual journey, but some may find the audio as distracting or annoying.

On Exploring Nature

This is episode 4 of this holiday’s Exploring series. With yesterday’s focus on light, there is a logical connection between light and nature. After all, light is the foundation for life as we know it on Earth … and nature is the center stage for each of our lives.

Nature is all around us. We interact with it, sense it, we explore it, and even ignore it. Thankfully, not everyone chooses to ignore it. As a matter of fact, they share what they’ve learned with anyone who is willing to learn.

Nature is a fascinating place and even linked to numbers. After watching this video, share your thoughts in the comments. Do you have a favorite pattern in nature?

On Fibonacci in Nature

Nature has many patterns, and they come in a variety of ways. Patterns can be simple, inspiring, microscopic, overt, sudden, gradual, and who knows how many ways as seasons, tides, anatomical structures, life created, processes, and behaviors. Patterns are associated with animals, plants, and the microscopic world.

For instance, the chambered nautilus is a biological relative to snails, squids, and octopi. Even though it is a simple organism, we stare with wonder at its shell and subsequent design. This mollusk also inspired Oliver Wendell Holmes to write the words below (taken from this poem named for its inspiration).

Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul,
As the swift seasons roll!
Leave thy low-vaulted past!
Let each new temple, nobler than the last,
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast,
Till thou at length art free,
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life’s unresting sea!

The Fibonacci sequence is a mathematical pattern linked to many patterns in nature. Tied to Leonardo of Pisa work in the early 1200s, the sequence appears in eastern cultures even earlier. The sequence can appear as a mathematical equation, a graphic representation, or in a photograph that may be just an image to the untrained eye.

Nonetheless, patterns in nature speak in their own language to help us understand the glories of the creation in which we live. Maybe this is one of the messages Dr. Seuss’s professes in these words:

I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees. I speak for the trees for they have no tongues.” —Dr. Seuss (The Lorax)

Enjoy this wonder video about the Fibonacci sequence in nature … and a special thanks to Kellie at The Beaglez for sharing this video with me. Below the video, I posted several photography links for anyone wanting to see more wonderful images.

Photography