Pronouns 2: The Musical – Act 2: Mine

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns 2: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

Why a sequel to Pronouns? Again, “Why not!”

Program

Act 1: My

 

Act 2: Mine

Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater. (Albert Einstein, scientist)

I believe every human has a finite number of heartbeats. I don’t intend to waste any of mine. (Neil Armstrong, astronaut)

Beyond a certain point, the music isn’t mine anymore. It’s yours. (Phil Collins, musician)

It is a cursed evil to any man to become as absorbed in any subject as I am in mine. (Charles Darwin, naturalist)

That brain of mine is something more than merely mortal, as time will show. (Ada Lovelace, mathematician)

Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same. (Emily Bronte, novelist)

Chaos is a friend of mine. (Bob Dylan, musician)

When a person is going through hell, and she encounters someone who went through hellish hell and survived, then she can say, ‘Mine is not so bad as all that. She came through, and so can I.’ (Maya Angelou, poet)

Guidelines

Songs must have Mine in the title

Cautions

  • No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  • Foreign language equivalents unacceptable

Production Note

To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please

  1. Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  2. Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Welcome back for Act 2 of Pronouns 2: The Musical. My introduction of this artists is simple. The year was 1995 – and when I first saw this video, I was hooked (for some mysterious reason). She’s also the reason I have a prosthetic left hand and my original hand is hermetically sealed for posterity. Ladies and gentleman – Shania Twain with Any Man of Mine.

Act 3: Our(s)

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Pronouns 2: The Musical – Act 1: My

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns 2: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

Why a sequel to Pronouns? Again, “Why not!”

Program

Act 1: My

My future is in my past and my past is my present. I must now make the present my future. (Vladimir Horowitz, musician)

I have shared my whole life. My private and my show business life. It helps me actually to feel my songs and to go on with my dreams. (Celine Dion, singer)

My thoughts, my beliefs, my feelings are all in my brain. My brain is going to rot. (Richard Dawkins, scientist)

What are my sources of strength? My husband and my three kids, my health-care team, and my religion. (Geraldine Ferraro, politician)

I was scared when I lost my mother, my father, my brother, my sister. (Israel Kamakawiwo’ole, musician)

I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works. (Oscar Wilde, dramatist)

My music is the spiritual expression of what I am – my faith, my knowledge, my being. (John Coltrane, musician)

I hurt my wife, my kids, my mother, my wife’s family, my friends, my foundation and kids all around the world who admired me. (Tiger Woods, athlete)

Guidelines

Songs must have My in the title

Cautions

  • No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  • Foreign language equivalents unacceptable

Production Note

  • To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please
    Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  • Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Welcome to Opening Night for Pronouns 2: The Musical. Never before in aFa Productions history have we ever had this fast of a turnaround. Then again, we feed off the enthusiasm of attendees. Thank you!

Act 1’s My theme offers many opportunities. Our production staff decided to go outside the box for this one. He’s a star – and he’s joined forces with a living legend for this song. Ladies and gentlemen – let’s make some noise for Toby Keith and the great Willie Nelson with Beer For My Horses. (Note: for the impatient, start at 50 seconds).

Next – Act 2: Mine (FYI: Not easy)

On Pronouns: The Musical – Encore

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

A subset of nouns, pronouns serve as a substitute for nouns and noun phrases. These bits of linguistics and grammar are versatile and can almost refer to anything.

Although pronouns can be personal, objective, possessive, indefinite, relative, intensive, demonstrative, interrogative, reflexive, and reciprocal, this musical extravaganza focuses on selected pronouns.

Program

Act 1: I
Act 2: You
Act 3: Me
Act 4: He
Act 5: Him
Act 6: She
Act 7: Her
Act 8: We
Act 9: Us
Act 10: They
Act 11: Them
Act 12: It

Encore

Guidelines

Songs must have two or more different pronouns (from this musical) in the title

Cautions

  • No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  • Foreign language equivalents unacceptable
  • Contractions are acceptable at the discretion of The Producer

Production Note

  • To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please
  • Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  • Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Wow! Encores don’t happen very often, and this may be an aFa first. Before introducing the next act, remember the following points about the theme about the song titles: a) two or more pronouns, b) pronouns must be different, and c) acceptable pronouns must be one of the 12 on the graphic.

Ladies and gentlemen, right here on this stage and for your enjoyment, with I’m Happy Just to Dance With You – it’s The Beatles!

Pronouns: The Musical – Act 12: It

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

A subset of nouns, pronouns serve as a substitute for nouns and noun phrases. These bits of linguistics and grammar are versatile and can almost refer to anything.

Although pronouns can be personal, objective, possessive, indefinite, relative, intensive, demonstrative, interrogative, reflexive, and reciprocal, this musical extravaganza focuses on selected pronouns.

Program

Act 1: I
Act 2: You
Act 3: Me
Act 4: He
Act 5: Him
Act 6: She
Act 7: Her
Act 8: We
Act 9: Us
Act 10: They
Act 11: Them

Act 12: It

It – a pronoun referring to something previously mentioned or easily identified

It – an abstract identity

It – an explicit or implicit circumstance, situation, abstract idea, or

It – slang for appeal, latest fads, or understanding

It – a Stephen King novel and movie

It – a cousin to the Addams family

Guidelines

Songs must have It in the title (beware of Its)

Cautions

  • No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  • Foreign language equivalents unacceptable
  • Contractions are acceptable at the discretion of The Producer

Production Note

  • To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please
  • Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  • Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Welcome to the final act of Pronouns: The Musical. We at aFa Productions weren’t sure how this one would go, so we greatly appreciate the response.

The list of songs we considered to open this act is lengthy – but when all was said and done, one song featuring a guest performer stood above the rest. The song was a mega-hit by a megastar. Featuring Jeff Davis, a Delaware police officer, here’s Taylor Swift with Shake It Off.

 

Encore?

Pronouns: The Musical – Act 11: Them

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

A subset of nouns, pronouns serve as a substitute for nouns and noun phrases. These bits of linguistics and grammar are versatile and can almost refer to anything.

Although pronouns can be personal, objective, possessive, indefinite, relative, intensive, demonstrative, interrogative, reflexive, and reciprocal, this musical extravaganza focuses on selected pronouns.

Program

Act 1: I
Act 2: You
Act 3: Me
Act 4: He
Act 5: Him
Act 6: She
Act 7: Her
Act 8: We
Act 9: Us
Act 10: They

Act 11: Them

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. (Maya Angelou, poet)

It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them. (Ralph Waldo Emerson, poet)

There is an amazing power getting to know your inner self and learning how to use it and not fight with the world. If you know what makes you happy, your personality, interests and capabilities, just use them, and everything else flows beautifully. (Juhi Chawla, actress)

Opportunities are like sunrises. If you wait too long, you miss them. (William Arthur Ward, writer)

If you love someone, set them free. If they come back they’re yours; if they don’t they never were. (Richard Bach, novelist)

No matter what kind of challenges or difficulties or painful situations you go through in your life, we all have something deep within us that we can reach down and find the inner strength to get through them. (Alana Stewart, actor)

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. (Albert Einstein, physicist)

Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies. (Mother Teresa, humanitarian)

My fake plants died because I did not pretend to water them. (Mitch Hedberg, comedian)

Guidelines

Songs must have Them in the title

Cautions

  • No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  • Foreign language equivalents unacceptable

Production Note

  • To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please
  • Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  • Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Welcome to the latest musical by aFa Productions – Pronouns: The Musical.

To some of us, them is similar to they because both are opposites of us. They and them are both pronouns. They and them are both third-person in reference – but they is a subject pronoun while them is an object pronoun. That’s enough grammar, so let’s get to the music.

He was recognized as a skilled drummer who played with many greats. Although he went on to have some solo recordings, those of us who remember the claymation California Raisins commercials probably didn’t know he was the lead vocalist. Because I loved this song during my youth, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to use this song to introduce Act 11. Ladies and gentlemen, let’s hear some loud cheers for Them Changes by the great Buddy Miles.

Bonus video: Eric Clapton & Stevie Winwood in their tribute to Buddy Miles

The last act: Act 12: – It (next Saturday) – PS: It includes it’s but not its

Pronouns: The Musical – Act 9: Us

The Story

Welcome to Pronouns: The Musical.

Some may ask, “Pronouns?”, but we at A Frank Angle say, “Why not pronouns!”

A subset of nouns, pronouns serve as a substitute for nouns and noun phrases. These bits of linguistics and grammar are versatile and can almost refer to anything.

Although pronouns can be personal, objective, possessive, indefinite, relative, intensive, demonstrative, interrogative, reflexive, and reciprocal, this musical extravaganza focuses on selected pronouns.

Program

Act 1: I
Act 2: You
Act 3: Me
Act 4: He
Act 5: Him
Act 6: She
Act 7: Her
Act 8: We

Act 9: Us

Let us always meet each other with smile, for the smile is the beginning of love. (Mother Teresa, humanitarian)

The power of imagination makes us infinite. (John Muir, naturalist)

To us, family means putting your arms around each other and being there. (Barbara Bush, First Lady)

Music, at its essence, is what gives us memories. And the longer a song has existed in our lives, the more memories we have of it. (Stevie Wonder, musician)

We are all of us stars, and we deserve to twinkle. (Marilyn Monroe, actor)

History teaches us that unity is strength, and cautions us to submerge and overcome our differences in the quest for common goals, to strive, with all our combined strength, for the path to true African brotherhood and unity. (Haile Selassie, leader)

Every great and deep difficulty bears in itself its own solution. It forces us to change our thinking in order to find it. (Niels Bohr, physicist)

Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained. (Marie Curie, chemist)

Guidelines

Songs must have Us in the title

Cautions

  1. No duplicates songs regardless of artists
  2. Foreign language equivalents unacceptable
  3. Contractions are acceptable at the discretion of The Producer

Production Notes

  1. To prevent browsers crashing from loading too many videos, please
    Include the song title and artist in your text, and
  2. Paste the URL as part of your last line (not a new line). The latter will provide a link, thus not embed the actual video … but I don’t mind unembedding, so apologies are not necessary.

Announcement

Welcome to the latest musical by aFa Productions – Pronouns: The Musical.

We are all gathered at this wonderful theater for Act 9 because it’s all about us. Having a chance to have this group here, well – the aFa production staff couldn’t pass the chance. Ladies and gentlemen, if this doesn’t get you moving, you have a problem. Welcome to one of my favorite groups and favorite songs, so let’s hear those loud cheers for Asleep at the Wheel with Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens.

Act 10: They (Date TBA)

Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 376

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Pronouns: The Musical continues its trek this weekend featuring songs with Us in the title. Curtain time is Saturday at 1:00 am (Eastern US).

The next beach walk will be the last of the season – but hopefully not the last of the series because I plan to return to the beach in the future.

Wishing all the best for those in Hurricane Florence’s path.

Last weekend we saw the stage version of Misery (Stephen King). Well done – so did you see the movie with Kathy Bates?

Downtown Cincinnati installed a controversial streetcar several years ago. According to Channel 12, ridership is 46% below expectations – and I am not surprised.

At the dance studio where we regularly attended social dances, the owner/instructor is absent on Fridays during September and October. “Students” are volunteering to lead the hour-long class before the dance – and I’m doing one in mid-October.

A soon-to-be-announced blog break is on the near horizon. After all, fall is approaching – and yes, it will interrupt Pronouns: The Musical.

In the past 6-9 months, CBS News has been in the news for the various harassment issues. Their on-air personal continues to impress me by the way they address the reports.

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This past Tuesday marked the 17th anniversary of 9-11. An editorial title by a local resident caught my eye: Shared purpose after 9/11 nonexistent today Below I pulled three paragraphs that resonated with me – and are perfect for the politics section of this post.

I was in Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001. Like all of us, I will never forget that day. But believe it or not, there is something about the days and weeks that followed 9/11 in New York that I actually miss. Something that we seem to have lost entirely today, and at great cost: a shared understanding of the world around us, and a common purpose. For me, that feeling was as unforgettable as anything else. …

Although New York City is famously diverse and also sometimes called the loneliest place on Earth, I found connection, common ground, and resolve in every eye I met walking the streets in those weeks. We were all thinking about the attack, the lives in the balance, and what we could possibly do to help. This shared understanding and purpose felt invigoratingly new then. It would be positively alien today. …

The public square is too regularly a shouting match, staged from our respective corners. This distance between so many of us has left in its wake a degraded political culture that simply can’t tackle big problems, or sometimes even little ones. And so those problems fester, trust in our institutions continues to dwindle and the distance grows.

For those interested, here’s the entire column.

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To lead you into this week’s dose of satirical headlines, The Onion made me laugh with this one about American politics – and the image is priceless. For more, click here.

Weekly Headlines from The Onion (combos welcome)

Two-faced house guest who didn’t need anything suddenly wants glass of water
Deformed, half-feathered Audubon Society President flees into forest after injecting self with bird DNA
Man discovers huge cache of rare fossils while walking through Natural History Museum
Returning Jesus Christ downed by U.S. missile defense 30,000 feet before making landfall
Is football bad for the NFL?
‘The Onion’ has chosen to publish an anonymous op-ed from two sources close to Trump who think their dad is the best president ever

Interesting Reads

A look back at Thomas Beckett, Henry II, and the church
Green the Sahara?
1968 in Eastern Europe
Linking chocolate syrup and medicine
Attempting to replicate termites in order to help society
The cello and the cellist
(Video) An interview with the first female to lead the cadet corp at The Citadel
(Photos) Stunning silhouettes from Africa

Early this past summer I started sending you into the weekend with a song having summer in the title. This post marks the end of the season here on OITS, so I send you into the weekend with a different version of the first song – this time by Cincinnati’s Comet Bluegrass All-Stars. (The audio isn’t the best.) Give it a chance and enjoy! In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.