On Murals of Belfast

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While cruising the British Isles in 2017, Belfast fascinated me. In my past post about Belfast, I opened the post with the following: Belfast, Northern Ireland is beautiful, interesting, and gut-wrenching – and we were only there for a part of one day. On one end is the natural beauty, architecture, vibrancy, and history – and the other end The Troubles – what the locals call the Northern Ireland Conflict (1968-1998).

Belfast, Northern Ireland has a history of conflict – especially in the past one hundred years. Many of us remember the conflict from fierce conflict that raged their land from the 1960s well into the 1990s – a conflict centered around politics and religion. Today, Belfast is a beautiful city. Yet, visitors who have a sense of history about The Troubles carry a strange and troubling feeling during their entire stay.

The Peace Wall that separates sectors of the city is anything but peaceful, while its stories feel like a punch in the gut. Beautiful murals are found throughout the city – but many are dedicated to the heroes of one side or the other. Others make political statements, and other commemorate battles or events.

I wanted to feature the murals, but do so got lost in the shuffle. So, I stumbled across what I do have when cleaning out the blog closet. Besides, Belfast’s murals would fascinate Resa.

The first is a different collection – especially when seeing their location (the last pic).

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Commercial Court is located in the part of the city known as the Cathedral Quarter. It’s a courtyard loaded with murals that included famous people. Enjoy the collection. Recognize anyone?

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Unfortunately, I didn’t capture many of the murals I saw around the city. For more information about Belfast’s murals, see the links below the video. They are fascinating, and not very subtle.

More Information

On a Cosmetic Nude

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ArtWorks is responsible for adding over 100 murals throughout Cincinnati – of which many are in the main part of the city. Thanks to Resa posting about street art in Toronto and Winnipeg, she has heightened my interest in these wonderful works of outdoor art that is in my city.

The one mural featured in this post first caught my attention several years ago when it I first saw the nearly completed version that was covered by scaffolding. Because I didn’t know much about why this mural was selected, its color and unique style caught my eye.

ArtWorks selected this design to be part of its Cincinnati Masters series – a collection of murals dedicated to the work of Cincinnati artists. Maybe in the future I’ll put them together into one post. To be honest, I didn’t know this artist – then again, I don’t claim to be knowledgeable about art. So, I decided to do this post in the style of a famous television game show – Jeopardy!

Answer: Born in Cincinnati, lived 1931-2004, graduated from the University of Cincinnati, and the Art Academy of Cincinnati

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Answer: He moved to New York City where cartoon strips were his initial success, but after 5 years he decided to pursue painting

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Answer: The Great American Nude series brought him fame in the art world
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Answer: He became well-known for his American Pop Art, and a contemporary to Andy Warhol
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Answer: He also developed his own techniques of using metals in metal-work sculptures; such as The Dropped Bra
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Answer: His Still Life is another series – Still Life #60 is a collection of things a woman will wear – causing some to suggest these object take the place of a nude while suggesting her presence.
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Answer: His mural is located at 811 Main Street in downtown Cincinnati

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Question: Who was Tom Wesselmann?

Although this mural caught my attention, I’ve never heard of Tom Wesselmann … at least now I know. Thanks ArtWorks!

To see more posts about the ArtWorks murals in Cincinnati, click here. Meanwhile, here’s a short video featuring Wesselmann’s work … and don’t forget to visit Resa to see the urban art she has captured.