On Election Night 2012

It’s Election Night in America. I wrote this post several days ago with this night in mind so, at the time I publish this, the elections results are young and without a declared winner in the race for president.

While one party likes to walk around with the pocket Constitutions, all members of Congress swear to uphold it. The U.S. Constitution is an interesting document, but to me, the following are the three most important words: We the people.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

We the People elect members to Congress to represent We the People in order to pass laws, control the budget, and exercise authorities granted by the Constitution.

We the People elect members to represent all people, which means not just the ones who voted for the elected; not an ideology; not a political party; not a religion, not a financial donor, not a special interest – but yes, to represent We the People.

We the People elect members to serve all people regardless of their faith, thus the elected are not to serve their religious preference. After all, the Constitution is quite clear regarding religion. Let the elected not forget that the Constitution lacks words as God, Creation, Christian, Jesus, and Lord (which only appears in the Signatory section).

Although Christian principles may have influenced the Founding Fathers, the Constitution does not declare the U.S. as a Christian nation. If the elected represent Christianity, what about the nonChristians? If the elected represents Christianity, which denomination will you represent? Then, what about the other Christians?

We the People are from all faiths and no faiths, therefore, our representatives should avoid submitting proposals on behalf of Christianity because what the church considers best for itself may not be in the best interest of We the People.

Representing We the People requires avoidance of firm ideology or a party each of these diverts attention from the needs of We the People. Adherence to a party or ideology silences We the People, and blocks the path to meaningful solutions.

Representing We the People requires conviction to represent the needs of the people who did not vote for the elected. After all, they too are We the People.

Representing We the People requires patience, the ability to listen, to desire to find the common good for all, to watch-out for and respond to human need that is beyond one’s self interests, party, or ideology.

Representing We the People requires discussing among yourselves to share ideas and concerns in order to work toward a solution for the common good – an idea that may be found in one side, the other, a compromise, or outside the grounds established by ideology, party, religion, self-interest, or special interest.

We the People need effective government to establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, to provide a common defense, to promote general welfare, and to secure liberty for all of We the People. Especially during this time, we need our elected officials to make difficult decisions – the ones that test their gut against their party, their ideology, their religion, their self-interest, their donors, and special interests.

Along with a president, on this day we elect all 435 members of the House of Representatives, and 33 members (approximately one-third) of the Senate. Their task seems simple, but I also know they will represent religion, a party, an ideology, self-interests, special interests, and donors over We the People – therefore, let me be the first to say the following about the newly elected, ‘Starting in 2014, throw the bums out. All of them! Clean house!” After all, We the People deserve better.

On the Empty

I started this blog in late August 2008 focusing primarily on politics and sports. At that time, the presidential campaigns were in full swing, and I had plenty of material to write. Forty-seven months later, I venture into a wide variety of topics, yet still enjoy politics. However, the recent U.S. presidential campaign bores me – and I can‘t see that changing.

We have two parties who control their candidates as a puppeteer controls the marionette.

We have two parties who answer to the big-dollar donors over their constituents.

We have candidates who don’t have much meaning in what they say – but they can deliver a tagline.

We have candidates who deliver speeches to achieve cheers from their faithful attendees (as if they wouldn’t) – and to raise money for their cause of rhetoric taglines.

We have candidates and surrogates who won’t say much beyond the predictable, scripted responses that probably won’t answer the question.

We have candidates whose campaign teams actively seek past sound bites by the opposition so they can deliver a message out of context in order to support their side.

We have candidates who focus on peripheral issues while avoiding engagement.

We have candidates who continually avoid facing the music in terms of making the tough decisions that require going against the grain.

We have candidates who essentially promote gridlock by proclaiming a lack of compromise based on self-serving principles.

We have popular commentators whose method of going beyond scripted taglines is by tossing firebombs of misinformation against the other side.

We have reporters who may want to ask the tough questions and dutifully push the responder to answer the question, but they also want the next interview.

Bottom Line: As partisans blindly accept whatever their side says while unquestionably objecting to anything coming from the other side, there is another segment that will decide the election. Although we are finally inside 100 days until Election Day, some are openly wondering why many independents remain undecided because there contrast between the two sides is somewhat defined.

True independents are pragmatic, and many will delay their decision until the last three weeks. Meanwhile, this population segment that will decide this election’s outcome has a difficult time shifting through all the crap in order to find an honest information, worthwhile dialogue, and potential solutions about the issues of the day. No wonder some of the independents are disgusted and bored. Then again, maybe we expect more from our leaders than they can deliver.

Opinions in the Shorts: Vol. 124

On Politics
Rick Perry’s candidacy ended several days before I thought it would.

With all the Republicans rage able President Obama’s rejection of the Keystone Pipeline, why is the Republican governor of Nebraska wanting a re-route for he would approve?

Very interesting that instead of losing the Iowa caucus by 8 votes, Rick Santorum won by 32 votes. Better yet, where as the Iowa Republican Party previously declared Mitt Romney the winner, the party now calls it a virtual tie. Ah yes … consider this an example that the power is not in the voters, but with the ones counting the votes.

Governor Romney changing from declaring victory to promoting a virtual tie is another example of fuzzy math. No wonder he is reluctant to release his tax returns.

Yippee … Congress is back in session!

Thursday morning I heard Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) explain (regarding SOPA) that the legislation will likely not proceed as quickly because “it is important for us to get it right.” Sorry Senator, that’s what I always expect and have no confidence in Capitol Hill to do that on any issue.

State of the Union is next week and a great chance for our senators and representatives to make asses of themselves on national television. Try sitting and listening for a change without partisan interruptions you jackwagons.

On Headlines from The Onion
Mischievous Raccoon Wreaks Havoc on International Space Station
Pervert Thinks You Seem Tense
Supreme Court Overturns Right v. Wrong
Poll Finds Americans Open to Third Type of Screwdriver
Local Woman Dies of Lost Cell Phone
Justin Timberlake Wins Golden Globe for Funniest Goofball at His Table

Special Edition: On Political Headlines from The Onion
President Obama Wonders Why He Always has to Initiate Phone Call with NCAA Champions
Minnesota Braces for Return of Bachmann’s Full Attention
Tentacle Quickly Smooths Romney’s Hair
Grover Norquist Admits Engaging in Week-Long Drug-Fueled Orgy with Corporate Income Taxes
Critics Slam Obama for “Just Standing There” during Photo Op
Congress Gets 12 Solid Hours of Gridlock before Calling it a Day

On Potpourri
We have our first nominee for 2012 Dolt of the Year – Costa Concordia Captain Francisco Schettino.

Last Monday, many commented that they still enjoy holding a book. In a similar thought, I still enjoy holding a newspaper. Unfortunately, many newspapers are a mere shell of their past. On the plus side, the Internet allows many news outlets to be a click away. Because I still have the urge to hold a good newspaper and with the Cincinnati Enquirer continually getting smaller and smaller, I have purchased the weekend edition of the Wall Street Journal.

The work project his hitting the fan, thus will be demanding many hours for a few months. So far, I’ve been able to keep up with posts, replying to comments has been slow, and visiting others has been minimal. Starting next week, I will cut back to three posts per week. Thanks for everyone’s patience and understanding.

In the words of Garrison Keillor, Be well, do good work, and keep in touch.

On a Needed Laugh

No matter of ones political persuasion, many of us have been anxiously watching and waiting the debt ceiling situation. Depending on the individual’s perspective, emotions and opinions range from A to Z and then some.

As of this writing on Sunday evening, still no deal – although the Breaking News is saying a vote will be on tomorrow. The opening of the Japanese market is nearing, so that could deliver an important sign of things to come. Who knows what we will awaken to in the morning.

Meanwhile, readers here need their Monday Morning Entertainment. We need smile and/or a giggle to break our mood.To me, this one fits the situation more ways than one, so I will let you make your own take. Enjoy, and have a good week.