On a Prize Ham

Sing along as the words are below the video!

Whose our favorite TV Star?
Who comes on with a wham?
Whose got the laughiest show by far?

(Porky) Porky Pig

Our favorite ham!

When the music starts
You wanna tap your toes
You feel like dancin’ a jig
Swing around in a circle and doe see doe
Time to watch Porky Pig!

Oh, tat’s Porky
Porky Pig
He’s the barnyard
Mr. Big!

Now promenade all around the room
And find yourself a good seat
The show’s a gonna be startin’ soon
Time to watch

Time to watch … Porky Pig

Background
Porky Pig is a long-time from Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies

Creators: Friz Freleng, Bob Clampett

Two of Freleng’s childhood classmates were nicknamed “Porky” and “Piggy”

Porky transitioned from a shy little boy to a slimmer adult

Bob Clampett permanently made Porky a young adult who was cuter, slimmer, smarter, and eventually less of a stutterer

Porky’s second outing, Gold Diggers of ’49 (1936), was also the first cartoon directed by Tex Avery

Originally voiced by Joe Dougherty (1935–1937)

Interestingly, Joe Dougherty had a natural stuttering problem, but producers replaced him with Mel Blanc because Dougherty’s uncontrollable stuttering increased production costs

Starting with the 24th film, Porky’s Duck Hunt (1937), Mel Blanc voiced voice Porky for over 50 years (1937–1989)

Filmography
He is the oldest continuing Looney Tunes character

Porky was once the star of the show before Bugs Bunny became the star …. even then, Porky continued to be popular

First appearance: I Haven’t Got a Hat (1935)
Last appearance: Muchos Locos (1966)

Porky Pig appeared in 153 cartoons during cartoon’s Golden Age

After debuting in 1935, 15-17 new shorts released each year (1936-1940). Production decrease to 12 (1941), 2-8 new releases (1942-1948), and then 1956 was the last year with more than 1 new release

Porky only has a minor role in his first film, but the fat little stuttering pig quickly became popular

Personal
Father is Phineas, but his mother is unnamed

Mild-mannered and shy personality

Personality allowed him to be a good straight-man for zany characters as Sylvester Pussycat, Charlie Dog, Daffy Duck, and/or Bugs Bunny

This short, but classic blooper, which is opposite to his screen personality, was made in 1938

Honors
Porky was ranked number 47 on TV Guide’s list of top 50 cartoon characters

Porky received only one Oscar nomination: The Swooner Crooner (1944)

Porky in Wackyland, a film that sends Porky on a quest to find the last of the surreal Dodos, was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry (2000)

Appearances
Regularly appeared with other Warner Brother stars in syndication

The Porky Pig Show, ran Saturday morning on ABC (1964 to 1967)

Porky Pig and Friends ran 1971-1990

Appeared in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Space Jam, and Back in Action

Porky’s own comic book ran from 1942-62, was revived in ’65 by Gold Key Comics, and continued until 1984

Appeared in Dell Comics’ Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies Comics until 1962

In his share of video games and on a variety of lunch boxes and T-shirts

His most well-known signature line is this classic

On Popeye Day

Get ready to sing along because today is Popeye Day! (Words will appear during the second stanza)

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During my youth, the Mr. Cartoon Show at 4 in the afternoon on WSAZ provided my weekday cartoon fix … and Popeye the Sailor was the star of the show. Once I learned about Saturday being Popeye Day (actually celebrating his comic strip debut in 1929), I delayed the next Explore post because this is the perfect opportunity to revisit some classic characters through past posts.

Here’s the main cast of characters
Popeye
Olive Oyl
Bluto
Wimpy

Which did you visit?

On the Greatest Hour

How many of the characters in the line can you name? The words to sing along are below the video.

Overture, curtain, lights!
This is it. The night of nights.
No more rehearsing or nursing a part.
We know every part by heart!

Overture, curtain, lights!
This is it. We’ll hit the heights!
And oh, what heights we’ll hit!
On with the show, this is it!

Tonight what heights we’ll hit!
On with the show, this is it!”

Timeline
The roots to this show started October 11, 1960 (a Tuesday night) when The Bugs Bunny Show premiering on ABC

The show originally composed of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons produced between August 1948 and December 1969

General Foods originally sponsored the show

In August 1962, ABC moved The Bugs Bunny Show to Saturday, but it was moved to Sunday morning in September 1967

In September 1968, moved to CBS which combined it with The Road Runner Show to make The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

Behind the scenes

  • Directed by Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson
  • Voices by Mel Blanc, June Foray, Stan Freberg, Hal Smith
  • Music Theme by Mack David and Jerry Livingston

Lineup
Here’s the lineup, which are also linked to their post. Which did you visit?

Cultural Influence

Show’s Closing

On Aesop’s Tale of the Fractured Son

Fractured

Fractured Fairy Tales and Aesop & Sons were two segments on various versions of Rocky and Bullwinkle. They presented fairy tales or fables in a humorous, modernized manner while altering the storyline.

Commonalities

Debuted in 1959 on ABC’s Rocky & His Friends (The first of the Rocky & Bullwinkle show titles)

Produced by Jay Ward

Became part of The Hoppity Hooper Show in 1964

Became part of the Dudley Do-Right Show in 1969

Did not spinoff into books or comics

 

Fractured Fairy Tales

Fractured Fairy Tales had three different introductions

Produced by Jay Ward

Narrated by Edward Everett Horton

Voices by June Foray, Bill Scott, Paul Frees, and an uncredited Daws Butler

91 episodes were made; first – Goldilocks; Last – The Youth Who Set Out to Learn What Fear Was (Click for episode list)

Each episode 4½ minutes long

One of the few TV cartoon series with no continuing characters,

Enjoy the Three Little Pigs

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Aesop and Son

Same theme music as Fractured Fairy Tales

Structure: Aesop attempting to teach a lesson to his son using a fable. After carefully listening to the story, the son undermines the moral with a pun.

Continuing Tag Line: ..and do you know the moral of the story?

39 episodes: First – The Lion and the Mouse; Last – The Fox and the Three Weasels (Click for episodes list)

Voices: Aesop by Charles Ruggles (the only Jay Ward character he did), Junior by Daws Butler

Here’s an episode: The Fox and the Winking Horse

On Beep Beep

Here’s one for the ages, so for those who don’t know the words, look below the video.

If you’re on the highway and Road Runner goes beep beep.
Just step aside or might end up in a heap.
Road Runner, Road Runner runs on the road all day.
Even the coyote can’t make him change his ways.

Road Runner, the coyote’s after you.
Road Runner, if he catches you you’re through.
Road Runner, the coyote’s after you.
Road Runner, if he catches you you’re through.

That coyote is really a crazy clown,
When will he learn he can never mow him down?
Poor little Road Runner never bothers anyone,
Just runnin’ down the road’s his idea of having fun.
Lyrics source: http://www.lyricsondemand.com

History
Created by Chuck Jones (Interview with him below) for Warner Brothers Merrie Melodies

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48 shorts (majority by Chuck Jones) with Wile E Coyote (his tribute here)

First: Fast and Furry-ous (Sept. 17, 1949)

Last: Sugar and Spies (1966) (directed by Robert McKimson)

Beep Prepared (1961) received an Academy Award nomination

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Additional TIdbits
Road Runner only vocalizes “Beep, Beep” by Paul Julian

#38 (with Wile E Coyote) on TV Guide’s list of 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters

Road Runner also known as Acceleratii incredibus, Velocitus tremenjus, Hot-roddicus supersonicus, Speedipus Rex, Velocitus delectiblus, Delicius delicius, Dig-outius tid-bittius, Tastyus supersonicus, Birdibus zippibus, Birdius high-ballius, Burnius-roadibus, Super-sonicus-tastius, Batoutahelius, Velocitus incalcublii, Digoutius-hot-rodis, Fastius tasty-us, Tid-bittius velocitus, Super-Sonnicus idioticus, Disappearialis quickius, Burn-em upus asphaltus, Semper food-ellus, Ultra-sonicus ad infinitum, Boulevardius-burnupius, Morselus babyfatius tastius, Geococcyx californianus

Road Runner cartoons follow the laws of cartoon physics

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See wonderful pics of a real road runner by visiting Cindy Knoke

The Road Runner Show aired on CBS from September 1966 to September 1968

Merged with The Bugs Bunny Show to create The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Hour (1968-1985)

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Comic history includes Dell Comics (1958-1962) and Gold Key (1966-1983)

Enjoy this tribute to Road Runner

On Ruff and Reddy

This one may be new to most readers, but this may be the first cartoon series I can recall watching. The words to sing along are below the video, so scroll down before playing the theme song to Ruff and Reddy.


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Get set, get ready,
Here come Ruff and Reddy.
They’re tough, but steady,
Always rough and ready.

They sometimes have their little spats,
Even fight like dogs and cats,
But when they need each other,
That’s when, they’re rough and ready.

Characters
Ruff, a straight and smart cat; Reddy, a dumb and stupid dog

Villains: “Scary” Harry Safari, Captain Greedy and Salt Water Daffy; and Killer and Diller

Ruff and Reddy, plus Professor Gizmo meeting aliens from Muni-Mula (a strange planet of metal) is their most memorable episode

Muni-Mula is (“aluminum” spelled backward)

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The Show
Created by Hanna-Barbera, and their first production

Ruff, voiced by Don Messick with a similar voice he would later use for Pixie the mouse

Reddy, voiced by Daws Butler with this southern draw later becoming the voice of Huckleberry Hound

The show featured a live action host/emcee (Jimmy Blaine), and the episodes had a narrator (Don Messick)

In the show (but between cartoon episodes), Puppeteers Rufus Rose and Bobby Nicholson provided comedic relief as Rhubarb the Parrot and Jose the Toucan.

For those needing more Muni-Mula

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Production
NBC originally broadcasted Ruff and Reddy in black and white in December 1957 on NBC

3 seasons, 156 episodes

First: Planet Pirates (Dec 14 1957)

Last: Have Blop Will Travel (Feb 4, 1960)

The episodes were not much longer than four minutes, including an opening song and much repetition of preceding events.

There were 13 episodes in each of the 12 stories of the serials

The show’s episodes borrowed from the serialized storytelling format of such shows as Crusader Rabbit that used episodes with cliffhanger storylines

Although NBC cancelled the show after 1959-1960, they revived the show the spring of 1962 with Captain Bob Cottle as the host

NBC cancelled the series in September 1964

Additional FYI
Ruff and Reddy was translated into other languages: Jambo & Ruivão (Brazilian Portuguese), Pouf & Riqui (French), Ruff e Reddy (Italian),  Жолтко и Лутко (Zoltko i Lutko) (Macedonian), Ruff y Reddy (Spanish), Ruff och Reddy (Swedish), つよいぞラフティ (Japanese), Ralofo le Rali (Tswana)

Dell Comics published 12 issues of Ruff & Reddy (1958-1962)

Here’s another episode, but without Muni-Mula, enjoy The Long Gone Leprechaun

On a Flashback Hodge Podge

Because I know some need a Saturday morning cartoon fix, I’m reaching back into the archives for readers to visit an early cartoon. I probably won’t introduce a new character until October, so hopefully this will help.

As I mentioned on the previous post, I am gearing down toward taking a blogging break. I’ll be back this week with Monday Morning Entertainment, where hopefully give the rest of my schedule.

Enjoy the cartoons. Which did you visit?

Elmer Fudd

Quickdraw McGraw

Snagglepuss

Underdog

Woody Woodpecker