On a Foghorn Reprise

With his classic, That’s a joke… I say, that’s a joke son, plus numerous one-liners, Foghorn Leghorn is one of my favorite classics. As a matter of fact, he was an early honoree here, but that was before I developed the format I now use. With that in mind, it’s time to give him this overdue honor!

Background
A large, friendly rooster with an overbearing personality

Created by Robert McKimson

Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons for Warner Brothers

Original based on The Sheriff, a West Coast radio character, but after the growing popularity of Senator Claghorn, a classic radio character on the nationally syndicated Fred Allen Show, Foghorn followed Claghorn’s character

Original voice by Mel Blanc (1946-1987), followed by 9 others

Starred in 28 cartoons between 1946 and 1963
First: Walky Talky Hawky (August 31, 1946)
Last: Banty Raids (1963)

Walky Talky Hawky nominated for Academy Award, but lost to Tom and Jerry’s The Cat Concerto

Made a cameo in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) and Space Jam (1996)

Appeared in commercials for GEICO, KFC, Oscar Meyer Hotdogs

Personal
Loves to hum Camptown Races, but only knew the words “Duh dah, Duh dah”

Appears with Henery Hawk – a young chickenhawk who usually is seen looking for a chicken to eat, but doesn’t know what a chicken looks like

Dog nemesis is Barnyard Dog (aka George P Dog)

Also appeared with Barnyard Cat, Bill the Weasel, Poppy and Elvis (Enjoy this classic rant with Barnyard Cat

In attempting to woo the widowed Miss Prissy, he babysits her son, Egghead Jr

Moves around a lot – one address is Cucamonga, California where he received a telegram from Rhode Island Red, but also flies south of the “Masie-Dixie Line” to get “out of the deep freeze and into the deep south”

Went to Chicken Tech and with his chum, Rhode Island Red

Grandfather to Feather Buster

Classic Quotes
Foghorn Leghorn has many classic one liners … enjoy the video with a collection, as well as the list below.

Okay, I’ll shut up. Some fellas have to keep their tongues flappin’ but not me. I was brought up right. My pa used to tell me to shut up and I’d shut up. I wouldn’t say nothin’. One time darn near starved to death. Wouldn’t tell him I was hungry.

Boys as sharp as a bowling ball.

Pay attention, boy!

Boy’s like a dead horse — got no get-up-and-go.

That boy’s as strong as an ox, and just about as smart.

That boy’s like a tattoo … gets under your skin.

Go away boy. Ya bother me.

This is gonna cause more confusion than a mouse in a burlesque show!

You’re doing a lot of choppin’, but no chips are flyin’. I’m cuttin’ but you’re not bleedin’!

Clunk enough people and we’ll have a nation of lumpheads.

Aaaaaahhhhh, shuuutupp!!

Nice girl, but about as sharp as a sack of wet mice.

That womans as cold as a nudist on an iceberg.

She reminds me of Paul Revere’s ride – a little light in the belfry.

Gal reminds me of the highway between Ft. Worth and Dallas – no curves.

Boy’s like a dead horse – got no get up and go.

That kid’s about as sharp as a pound of wet liver.

If kid don’t stop talkin’ so much he’ll get his tongue sunburned.

That dog’s as subtle as a hand grenade in a barrel of oat meal.

Look sister, is any of this filtering through that little blue bonnet of yours?

I’ve got this boy as figgity as a bubble dancer with a slow leak.

You look like two miles of bad road.

I-I-I know what you’re gonna say son. When two halves is gone there’s nuthin’ left – and you’re right. It’s a little ol’ worm who wasn’t there. Two nuthins is nuthin’. That’s mathematics son. You can argue with me but you can’t argue with figures. Two half nuthins is a whole nuthin’.

Enjoy the full episode of PoP Goes the Weasel (1953)

On the Greatest

Thanks to Rich for the above
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Notables
Bugs Bunny is a cultural icon

According to NPR, Bugs has appeared in more films (both short and feature-length) than any other cartoon character and is the ninth most-portrayed film personality in the world

A Wild Hare (1940) received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Short Film

Since his debut, Bugs only appeared only in color Merrie Melodies films

Bugs only appearance in a black-and-white Looney Tunes film is a cameo in Porky Pig’s Feat (1943)

Bugs did not star in a Looney Tunes film until that series made its complete conversion to only color cartoons (1944)

The first cartoon character honored on a U.S. postage stamp

On December 10, 1985, Bugs received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Ranked #1 in TV Guide’s 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time (2002)

His stock…has never gone down…Bugs is the best example…of the smart-aleck American comic. He not only is a great cartoon character, he’s a great comedian. He was written well. He was drawn beautifully. He has thrilled and made many generations laugh. He is tops. (A TV Guide editor on CNN)

Bugs cartoons are listed 34 times on The 100 Greatest Looney Tunes list of cartoons

Bugs also received an Oscar nomination for Hiawatha’s Rabbit Hunt (1942)

Because Hiawatha’s Rabbit Hunt didn’t win, What’s Cookin’ Doc? (1944) spoofed the Academy in which Bugs demands a recount by claiming “sa-bo-TAH-gee”

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Knighty Knight Bugs (1958) with a medieval Bugs trades battling Yosemite Sam and his fire-breathing dragon (which has a cold), won an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film

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Rabbit Fire, Rabbit Seasoning, and Duck! Rabbit, Duck! compose the “Rabbit Season/Duck Season” trilogy and are famous for originating the “historic” rivalry between Bugs and Daffy Duck

What’s Opera, Doc? (1957), casts Bugs and Elmer Fudd in a parody of Richard Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen, and the US Library of Congress (in 1992) deemed it “culturally significant”, thus selecting it for preservation in the National Film Registry

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Personal
Born July 27, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York below Ebbets Field (home of the Brooklyn Dodgers)

Characteristics include clever, trickster, flippant, and personable until you mess with me attitude (and this scene is one of my all-time favorites)
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A known traveler, but frequently making the wrong turn in Albuquerque

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Antagonists include Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, Willoughby the Dog, Marvin the Martian, Beaky Buzzard, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig,Tasmanian Devil, Gossamer, Cecil Turtle, Witch Hazel, Rocky and Mugsy, Wile E. Coyote, the Crusher, Gremlin, Count Blood Count and a host of others

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Bugs’ carrot-chewing standing position, is based a Clark Gable scene with Claudette Colbert in a scene from It Happened One Night

Bugs occasionally communicates with the audience to explain something to the audience, such as

  • Be with you in a minute, folks!
  • Feisty, ain’t they?
  • That happens to him all during the picture, folks.
  • Gee, ain’t I a stinker?
  • Of course you know, this means war!

The origin of a classic Bugs Bunny line

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Background
Happy Rabbit, though different looking and a forerunner to Bugs, first appears in Porky’s Hare Hunt (1938)

Created by the animators and staff of Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) with staff including Tex Avery, Robert McKimson, and Mel Blanc

Mel Blanc originated the Bugs Bunny’s voice

Debuted in A Wild Hare (July 27, 1940) featuring Elmer Fudd and Bugs in a hunter-tormentor relationship

A Wild Hare also debuted Bugs’ most famous catchphrase: “What’s Up Doc?”

First use of Bugs Bunny’s name on-screen is in Elmer’s Pet Rabbit (1941)

“Bugs” Bunny (quotation marks only used, on and off, until 1944)

168 cartoon shorts, most of which were directed by Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson and Chuck Jones

Buckaroo Bugs was Bugs’ first film in the Looney Tunes series

Last Golden Age appearance in False Hare (1964)

12 episodes have been banned because of political correctness

An interview Martha Goldman Sigall (at age 92 in June 2009) who worked at Leon Schlesinger’s Studios in 1939 when the studio created Bugs Bunny

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Beyond Cartoons
In the fall of 1960, ABC debuted the prime-time television program The Bugs Bunny Show

The Bugs Bunny Show (through different formats and titles) appeared on network television for 40 years

Bugs featured in various network television specials in the 1970s and 80s

Films include Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Box Office Bunny, and Space Jam

Because of an equal-time agreement between Warner Brothers and Disney, Bugs Bunny and Mickey Mouse always appeared together in Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Who Framed Roger Rabbit introduced Bugs’ girlfriend, Lola Bunny (see a tribute)

Bugs has also appeared in numerous video games
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Memorable Lines
My favorite when referring to politicians

A few other … do you remember any of these?

  • Don’t take life too seriously. You’ll never get out alive.
  • OOH! Look at four-legged airplane!
  • Carrots are devine… You get a dozen for a dime, It’s maaaa-gic!
  • Eeeeeeh, watch me paste that pathetic palooka with a powerful, pachydermous, percussionpitch.
  • Don’t think it hasn’t been a little slice of heaven…’cause it hasn’t!
  • Well, what did you expect in an opera? A happy ending?
  • Do you happen to know what the penalty is for shooting a fricaseeing rabbit without a fricaseeing rabbit license?
  • I wonder what the poor bunnies are doing this season?
  • Oh, well, we almost had a romantic ending!
  • My, I’ll bet you monsters lead innnnteresting lives.
  • Here I go with the timid little woodland creature bit again. It’s shameful, but…ehhh, it’s a living.
  • I bet you say that to all the wabbits.
  • For shame, doc. Hunting rabbits with an elephant gun. Why don’t you shoot yourself an elephant?
  • I know this defies the law of gravity, but I never studied law!
  • Eh, what’s up, doc?

On the Love Skunk

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A Warner Brothers, Looney Tunes, and Merrie Melodies cartoon character

A French skunk who is constantly seeking love

Storylines typically involve Pepé in pursuit of what appears to be a female skunk (“la belle femme skunk fatale”)

Has two big turnoff: his odor and his inability to take “no” for an answer

Created by Chuck Jones (1945)

A short video with Chuck Jones on Pepé

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17 shorts; first – Odor-able Kitty, last – Louvre Come Back to Me (1962)

1949 Academy Award winner: For Scent-imental Reasons

First voiced by Mel Blanc, who based the voiced on Charles Boyer’s Pepé le Moko (Algiers, 1938)

In first short he was named Stinky, but revealed to by a philandering American skunk named Henry with wife and children

Odor of the Day (1948) is the only cartoon in which Pepé is not a “lovebird” nor does he have a French accent; but not directly by Chuck Jones (but Arthur Davis)

Memorable Lines

  • Do not come wiz me to ze Casbah – we shall make beautiful musicks togezzer right here!
  • I am ze locksmith of love, no?
  • I am the broken heart of love. I am the disillusioned. I wish to enlist in the Foreign Legion so I may forget. Take me!
  • I like it! Come back! Ze corned beef does not run away from ze cabbage!
  • How is it that she can sleep when I am so near? We must stoke the furnace of love, must we not?

Links with Pepé sound clips
From Soundboard
From Megawavs

Enjoy this episode: The Cats Bah

On a Hippety

A young kangaroo character in Warner Brothers Looney Tunes cartoon

Antagonist to Sylvester the Cat and Sylvester Junior

Hippety Hopper is not to be confused with Hoppity Hooper

Common storyline:

  • Hippety escaping from somewhere (zoo, circus, etc)
  • Hippety is mistaken as a giant mouse
  • Hippety takes Sylvester’s attempt to capture prey as playful horseplay, thus playfully beats, batters, and bruises Sylvester

Mother is Mrs. Hopper, who calls him Junior

Created by Robert McKimson

First appearance – Hop, Look, and Listen (1948); last – Freudy Cat (1964)

Appear in 13 shorts 1948-1964

Enjoy Hop, Look, and Listen

Before leaving, I encourage you to visit Doggy’s Style in order to make a comment. Doggy’s is doing this as an noble fund-raising effort, so make sure you add that Frank sent you.

On a Whirlwind

After last week’s post populated with numerous never-heard-of-him comments, thought it was in everyone’s best interest to have a familiar character. Look who’s here!

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Taz is short for the Tasmanian Devil

The youngest Looney Tune character,

First appearance in Devil May Hare (June 19, 1954)

Only in 5 cartoon shorts before Looney Tunes studio closed in 1964

Short-tempered dimwit with a ravenous appetite, especially for rabbits

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Created by Robert McKimson

Originally voiced by Mel Blanc, followed by 7 others

Taz soundboard

Warner Brothers head thought Taz was too violent for kids (and parents would dislike it), so order McKimson to stop using Taz

Got his on show in 1991: Taz-Mania Intro

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Relatives: Hugh (father), Jean (mother), Molly (sister), Jake (brother), Drew (Uncle), Tasmanian She-Devil (wife), Dizzy-Devil (cousin), Slam Tasmanian (descendant)

Interesting jousting history between Warner Brothers and the Tasmanian government regarding using Taz for marketing purposes

Yes – I have a golf shirt with an image of Taz

Enjoy the full-length original episode: Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare (1954)