On Doors

Door – Old English duru, dor, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch deur ‘door’ and German Tür ‘door,’ Tor ‘gate’; from an Indo-European root shared by Latin foris ‘gate’ and Greek thura ‘door’

Door – the entrance to a room or building

Door – a hinged, sliding, or revolving barrier at the entrance to a building, room, or vehicle, or in the framework of a cupboard

Door – a reference to the distance from one building in a row to another

Door – A structure that opens, closes, swings, slides, shuts, hides, protects, and symbolizes

If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.” (Milton Berle, comedian)

The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential… these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence.” (Confucius, philosopher)

I truly believe that everything that we do and everyone that we meet is put in our path for a purpose. There are no accidents; we’re all teachers – if we’re willing to pay attention to the lessons we learn, trust our positive instincts and not be afraid to take risks or wait for some miracle to come knocking at our door.” (Marla Gibbs, actor)

Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.” (George Washington Carver, scientist)

Don’t spend time beating on a wall, hoping to transform it into a door.” (Coco Chanel, designer)

Happiness often sneaks in through a door you didn’t know you left open.” (John Barrymore, actor)

Not knowing when the dawn will come I open every door.” (Emily Dickinson, poet)

Listen; there’s a hell of a good universe next door: let’s go. (e. e. Cummings, poet)

 

No matter if it’s old or new, elegant or simple, metal or wood, ornate or plain – a door is a door while being a wonderful symbol and metaphor. Any favorite doors above or below?

All images taken by me  (a nonphotographer in Italy.

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On 50 Shades of Light

Gray to the Americans is grey to the British

Gray – from the Old English grǣg; related to Dutch grauw and German grau

Gray – as in gri (Albanian), grisa (Basque), šedá (Czech), grigio (Italian), pelēks (Latvian). szary (Polish), cinza (Portuguese), llwyd (Welsh). and more (feel free to add your own)

Gray – a noun, adjective, a verb, or a personal name

Gray – as noun: gray, grays

Gray – a color or a pigment between black and white

Converted from a color print. Many shades of gray as well as black and white. Near Page, Arizona

Converted from a color print. Many shades of gray as well as black and white. Near Page, Arizona

 

Gray – a member of the Confederate army in the US Civil War

Gray – as a verb as in gray, graying, grayed

A foggy morning, nothing left except gray

A foggy morning, nothing left except gray

 

Graying – as with hair, aging

Gray – as an adjective, as in gray, grayer, grayest

Bryce Canyon, one of the most color places anywhere - yet still beautiful in monochrome

Bryce Canyon, one of the most color places anywhere – yet still beautiful in monochrome

 

Gray – synonyms include silvery, gunmetal al, slate, charcoal, smoky, hoary

Gray – related to old people, as in growing old, mature, older

Gray – as a description of the weather, as in cloudy, overcast, dull, sunless, gloomy, dreary, dismal, somber, bleak, murky

Winter washing away the color photo

Winter washing away the color photo

 

Gray – a person’s face – as in pale, tired, aged, ill, ashen, wan, pale, pasty, pallid, colorless, bloodless, white, waxen

Gray – without interest or character – as in faceless, characterless, colorless, nondescript, insipid, jejune, unremarkable, flat, bland, dry, stale

Gray – as in monochrome – a photograph or picture executed in varying tones of black and white – or even of one color

A photo converted into "DaVinci" sketch using Topaz Impression software

A photo converted into “DaVinci” sketch using Topaz Impression software

Gray – the monochromic version – achromatic, colorless, neutral, dirty, dull, faded, pale, chalky, ashen, washed-out … that’s gray … as in 50 shades of light

A whiteout in Oklahoma

A whiteout in Oklahoma

 

Steve is not only a long-time friend and photography enthusiast, we’ve collaborated on several occasions right here. I write the text and he selected the images to embed at various points.

I encourage everyone to visit his site to see his photos, which are available for purchase. He may also respond to comments here when he can, so feel free to ask him questions.

Photos by Steve Ancik @ LightWave Images

On Light

Light … a noun, an adjective, a verb

Light … what makes sight possible

Light … a brightness produced by an illuminant

Light … an electromagnetic radiation

Rainbow

Light … travelling (in a vacuum) at a speed of about 186,281 miles (300,000 kilometers) per second

Light … the sensation arousing the stimulation of visual receptors

Light … a spiritual illumination, a truth, an enlightenment, from a point of view

Sky1

Light … something that informs, a public knowledge

Light … an aspect or appearance presented to view

Light … a medium (as a window)

Beverly

Light … a set of principles, standards, or opinions

Light … a leading person in a particular field or place

Light … as a source – a lighthouse, a beacon, a traffic signal

Lighthouse

Light … a flame to start burning, to ignite

Light … from the point of view

Light … a glare, gleam, glow, illumination, radiance, shine, brightness, luminosity, dazzle, blazing

June Moon

Light … an expression in someone’s eyes indicating a particular emotion or mood.

Light … understanding of a problem or mystery

Light … fluorescence, incandescence, LED, halogen, natural

Wall

Light … an aspect, angle, slant, approach, interpretation, viewpoint, standpoint, context

Light … an area of something that is brighter or paler than its surroundings

Light … as in lights, lit, lighting, lighted

Candle

Light … as a descriptor of little mass, weight, low density, easy to lift, lightweight

Light … as a color shade, hue, tone, complexion

LightMood

Light … as a taste – not sweet, not heavy, not too strong

Light … a descriptor of quantity – as in a meal – small, modest, simple, easily digested

Light … a descriptor of food – as porous, fluffy, low-calorie, easy to digest, small quantity

Light … as in easy, simple, undemanding

DewLight

Light … as in frivolous, superficial, undemanding, trivial

Light … as in gentle, delicate, soft, dainty

Light … as a comparative – light, lighter, lightest

Special thanks to Robin (MaidinSun Photography) for providing the photographs. I encourage readers to visit her at Breezes at Dawn. All photos are copyrighted by MaidinSun Photography.

On Connections

Connection: from the Latin connexion-, connexio, from conectere
First Known Use: 14th century

Connection: The act of connecting

Connection: The state of being connected

Bolts and Rust

Bolts and Rust

Connection: A correspondence between two partially ordered sets

Connection: Contextual relation or association

Connection: Relationship in fact

Connection: Causal or logical relation or sequence

Chained Down

Chained Down

Connection: A relation of personal intimacy

Connection: Common interest as political, denomination, social, professional, or commercial

Connection: An arrangement to execute orders or advance interests of another

Connection: A means of communication or transportation

On the Rails Again

On the Rails Again

Connection: A personal tie by marriage, kinship, or clan

Connection: A source of contraband

Connection: A an electronic link between databases, terminals, or virtual

Synonyms include coherence, continuity, link, affinity, association, kinship, liaison, linkage, relation, relationship, union

Antonyms include breakup, disconnection, dissolution, disunion, division, parting, partition, schism, scission, split

Unhinged

Unhinged

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Connection: an early Rolling Stones song

Steve is a long-time friend, a good guy, and long-time photography enthusiast. It’s been a while since we’ve done a joint post. This time I picked the theme, wrote the text, then challenged him to provide the photos. See our other collaborations (Time and Waves) by going to the Sidebar > Categories > Photos by Steve or by clicking here.

I encourage everyone to visit his site to see his photos, which are available for purchase. He will also respond to comments here when he can, so feel free to ask him questions.

Photos by Steve Ancik, LightWavesImages

On a Word Choice

I imagine many sports fans are like me – that is having one team – that is having one team they detest under any and all circumstances. Instead of many, it may even be most sports fans … but I’m confident this isn’t true for all.

For me, it’s the University of Kentucky (UK) – especially in basketball. After all, I’m unhappy even when they lose. I can honestly say that their fans drove me to that point because I find UK fans to be arrogant, condescending, blind, self-centered, and more uncomplimentary adjectives.

I know that UK fans haven’t cornered the market on that behavior. After all, a large school in the center of my state exhibits similar behavior regarding a ball of another shape that bounces funny.

I’m confident that my statement isn’t true for all UK fans – and I’m unsure if most qualifies because I don’t have the numbers to support the statement. Yet, I find many is a good descriptor because being a relative term and a bit vague. After all, on first thought a million is many, but is it when compared to a billion?

However, this post isn’t about sports or the University of Kentucky because the above sets the stage for my experience and point.

Sometime in January 2014 I was reading a humorous post about the start of a new year. It was quite amusing and very well done … well … until reading one important sentence. In the blogging world, I tend to take the high road to avoid confrontation, so I didn’t comment – but the statement kept festering in my mind – so I returned to add my thoughts to the comments section.

My comment wasn’t disrespectful to the host – not even snarky – but I made my point in a respectful manner, and the host reciprocated the same way. We exchanged several comments, and in the end, while agreeing to disagree, I moved on … and yes, I have returned since the encounter.

To me, at issue was the word all – a word that is quite inclusive. Because many or most wasn’t used, I don’t positively know that my reaction would have different, but because I focused on all, I’m confident that my reaction would have been different.

Is there a difference in using many, most, and all? Is blog writing so informal that we should overlook the use of these descriptors?

 

On Palaver

I once wondered about the Word Count on these pages. Unfortunately, that cumulative statistic is not on our dashboard, and given the previous 1,335 posts, I loath going through each individual post to determine the sum. There’s also the question of how many different words I’ve used here, but at I’m confident in the fact that this sentence doesn’t contain any new ones.

The Global Language Monitor (GLM) estimated the number of English language words to be 1,019,729.6. Even though that six-tenths of a words bothers me, there is no need to worry because the entire number is obsolete because the same organization states a new word is create every 98 minutes. Because the GLM issued the figure for January 1, 2012, the current count at the time of this post is 1,030,264, but that number is also obsolete depending on the time you read this gibberish.

Photo by Pierre Metivier

Photo by Pierre Metivier

Being that Google seems to want to get their hands into everything, a Google/Harvard Study of Current Number of English Words declares the word count to be 1,022,000. Even though I’m happy with the round number and the lack of a decimal as GLM, I’m not going to quibble about the 0.0121% differential.

To fit my propensity for joviality conviviality on this blog, wordsmiths may want to note that the millionth word was formed on June 10, 2009 at 10:22 GMT. but nobody knows the actual word, which is quite the quandary.

The Oxford English Dictionary (Second Edition) contains 171,476 words in current use with another 47,156 words declared as obsolete. For fans of other dictionaries, Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged along with its Addenda Section, has a number that is close enough, although I’m not sure it is exact.

Who knows about compound words, which can be a headache because cleanup and clean-up are two distinct words, but clean up is separate two words that aren’t either of the previous two.

Data is a very common word, but when we use it, wordsmiths debate which of the following is correct: The data is accurate or The data are accurate? But the data-are people are unlikely to embrace datum.

When cooking spaghetti, my wife asks for my judgment. She hands me a piece of spaghetti (which is correct), but spaghetti is plural, so would one string be spaghettum or spaghetto? Actually, the latter is correct – but she may prefer judgement over my judgment. Of course, which of those two is correct depends on the dictionary one prefers.

Whereas the printing industry gives us Scrabble gems as em and en. I don’t know if the official count differentiates color from colour, of if it is American English, British English, or whatever. I certainly am not going to worry about if the number includes informal and/or slang words.

However, I’m confident I didn’t grow-up ever using or even hearing words as internet, googled, RAM, ginormous, bytes, jorts, twerk, and many more.  Of course everyone knows that numnah (which should never be confused with numbnuts) is a felt or sheepskin pad placed between a horse’s back and the saddle to prevent chafing. (Merriam-Webster).

Regional differences add confusion, so I’m not going to worry about whether mangos are found with the fruits or vegetables in the grocery store’s produce department; but I knew what do get when Mom asked for one. I also recall a college incident when I mentioned forgetting my toboggan, and then my friend wondered why I was returning to my room to get a sled to wear.

I don’t know if that number of words includes subject-matter specific words. Who knows how many science words exist, especially the medical words, such as a condition that politicians are suffering from – encephaloproctia. Let the record show that I also don’t stay awake at night wondering which is the proper past tense, shat or shitted.

Those who have read this far may still be wondering about the purpose of this post. Some say this is my feeble attempt to write like Archon, well forget that idea! Others may trace this to Oxford English Dictionary awarding Word of the Year to selfie –  Ah heck, I was taking those long before it was a word.

The bottom line is that this post is about words that I’ve never used on this blog. Heck, there are more than a few first-time words in this post. So, your challenge is to find a never-used word (in English) here and use it in a sentence.

Do you remember this famous use of euonym?

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Palaver: (n) prolonged, aimless discussion

On Shadows

There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. ― Charles Dickens

A dark figure cast upon a surface by something intercepting the rays from a source of light

A partial darkness or obscurity

An imperfect and faint representation

An imitation or copy

A shaded or darker portion of a picture

The darkness following sunset

A state of obscurity

Some people seemed to get all sunshine, and some all shadow… ― Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

A pervasive and dominant influence or presence

A remnant, an insignificant amount, an inferior focus

An area near an object

A darkened area of skin under the eye

An incipient growth of beard that makes the skin look darker

An inseparable companion or follower

A nearby or adjoining region

A reflected image

A source of gloom or unhappiness

A shelter for protection

Keep your face always toward the sunshine – and shadows will fall behind you. ― Walt Whitman

Related words: phantom, dusk, umbra, shade, shadiness, blackness, dimness, gloom, murkiness, obscurity, somberness, cloudiness

Enjoy for a day journey with the shadows of Italy. Which are your favorites? Ciao!

Monterosso for a Late Lunch

Monterosso al Mare for a Late Lunch

Shining Church in Vernozza

Shining Church in Vernozza

Peeking through the shadows in Florence

Peeking through the shadows in Florence

A Sunny Day in San Gimignano

A Sunny Day in San Gimignano

Falling Shadows in San Gimignano

Falling Shadows in San Gimignano

In the Shadows of San Gimignano

In the Shadows of San Gimignano

Leaving the Light On in San Gimignano

Leaving the Light On in San Gimignano

A University Building in Pisa

A University Building in Pisa

Pisa at Dusk

Pisa at Dusk

Night falls in Lucca

Night Falls in Lucca on the Bascilica of San Frediano