On a Beach Walk: #61 (Beauty)

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I like walking the beach. It’s good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

It is beautiful here – so today I wonder about beauty. What is beauty? Why is it different for everyone? Why is beauty in the eyes of the beholder?

We apply beauty to people, places, and things as events, music, arts, architecture, and more. The bottom line: Beauty is a state of pleasure; a specialized level of satisfaction.

For me, I think the most beautiful places I’ve seen. Nā Pali coast on Hawaii’s island of Kauai being the most beautiful uninhabitable place. But where people live, Italy’s Amalfi Coast grabs me with an irresistible force. Through my heritage, the valley setting of Bagni di Lucca on the Serchio River in northern Tuscany touches my heart.

The beauty of events etch a memory forever. Watching a sunset behind the Pacific from a plateau above the sea on Kauai was spectacular. Approaching Venice on a cruise ship, then going through a canal to dock streetside is a memory stuck in my brain. The colors of the sunrise I see here on this coast are inspiring. The tear that rolled down my check when I saw my wife walk down the aisle at our wedding.

Beauty is the peace delivered by a different messenger to different people – maybe a baby’s smile, a gentle touch, the togetherness of family, a ray of sunshine, or even a personal walk on a beach.

Nature’s beauty shows through its seemingly infinite design. Snow-capped mountains, sandy beaches, brilliant flowers, colorful fish, a herd of wild animals on a distant slope of grass – let alone the mathematical brilliance of a Fibonacci pattern or the brilliant geometrical designs seen through electron micrographs or even a spider’s web – or how common life processes are accomplished by a range of organisms from a single cell to plants to the largest animal.

The colors displayed by the Grand Canyon’s rock layers is one thing – but how the sun’s angle changes them throughout the day is inspiringly beautiful.

Although beauty can vary across time and cultures, through nature and behaviors, beauty is also timeless. The beauty of a person’s actions as sincerity, goodness, charitableness, helpfulness, and kindness are just that – timeless and not limited by cultural boundaries – as are the empathetic heart and listening ear.

Beauty is that combination of shape, color, and pattern that we find in art. Certain pieces and styles move a person – they stir the soul – but to others, their teeth hurt because their tastes and preferences differ. They see beauty elsewhere.

We can hear beauty. From the babbling stream, to the roaring water of a grand waterfall, to the calming waters of a walk on the beach, or a walk in a serene meadow. The physical beauty and natural sounds can capture the soul.

We hear the beauty of words. Some inspire, while others honor. Some words transform us, while others deliver peace and comfort through the right place at the right time.

The beauty of music can transport us to another place. Rachmaninoff delivers love while  Copeland brings pride through instrumental compositions. Many others do it through their voice that sings the beauty of the lyricist’s phrases.

I look across humanity to see many physical beauties: the glow of Nordic beauty – the exoticness of Middle Eastern beauty – the sensuality of Mediterranean beauty – the kindness in Oriental beauty – the steely and mysterious nature of Eastern European beauty – the regal confidence of African beauty – the uniqueness of Indian beauty that perhaps comes from cultural blending through genetics over many years.

Beauty is something we can see in cultures – through dress, customs, language, and actions. Each of our cultures do something for ourselves, while other cultures may be different, one can find beauty there.

Beauty is not limited to the eyes and ears. Aromas from the kitchen ignite a bountiful of beautiful thoughts and memories. We notice the beauty when our fingers pass over the smooth surface of a fine sculpture or the soft skin of our lover.

Let us not forget the beauty beach shells provide as I walk. From the physical designs to the combination of colors – from the small to the large – the smooth to the ridged. There is beauty in those shells for those taking time to look.

Yes, each of us determine beauty through our own lens. More importantly, life is full of beauty for those who not only take time to look and listen – but also to engage all the senses.

This beach is a beautiful place providing a collection of various beauties. Thinking about beauty is a reason I like walking the beach, which is good for the mind, body, and soul – and refreshing on my feet.

32 thoughts on “On a Beach Walk: #61 (Beauty)

  1. Gosh Frank. When you look at the world like this, it is stacked with beauty. This is a truly wonderful post – almost like a tribute to all that is gorgeous in the world. My favorite part “The tear that rolled down my check when I saw my wife walk down the aisle at our wedding.” So beautiful Frank.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Oh, and what a beautiful post this is… I’m sure this is not subjective either! Although true beauty is objective, the one that brings joy and peace to each of us, is subjective. Loved the song too. Perfect for a Monday morning. Thank you, Frank! Yamas! 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. This is SO GOOD. Enjoyed every word.
    Beauty is an enigma. That each of us find it in different, unique places is what makes each of special, the observer and the object of beauty.

    These for me are my favourite posts. We get to see your wonderful self all thoughtful and profound. Love it
    Xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  4. It was a beautiful just-shy-of 80º F on Saturday, with mid-60’s yesterday. In November. 😲 Today I’m watching a beautiful Norman Rockwell-like falling snow storm with temps in the teens. Thank you for taking us on a beautiful walk.

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  5. It’s interesting how our perception of beauty evolves, too. For example, when I first saw the desert landscape of Utah, the absence of green (my favorite color) made it appear ugly. Now that I’m steeped into this landscape it’s endlessly and deeply beautiful to me.

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  6. Your wonderful post has me flummoxed this morning trying to decide what to include as my concepts of beauty. Music-wise I’m with you on the music of Sergei Rachmaninoff, particularly the 1st Mov. of his Second Piano Concerto. Also I’ll include John Denver’s vowel sounds as they come through in his recording of “Aspenglow,” in the video you included. By the way, I rank Denver’s vowel sounds as second only to Bing Crosby’s. Beyond that I’ll go with the 7th hole at the Pebble Beach Golf Course.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tim,
      There’s so much to say about the beauty in music. Thinking about singing voices, our ears have a listening preference, therefore prefer certain voices. Personally, a prefer mellow, rounded altos. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

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  7. What a lovely (beautiful) post, Frank. I make a point of finding some gift from the natural world to enhance each day. It’s not difficult at all. If we keep our attention tuned to what’s around us beauty is in abundance. That’s what often keeps me going when the grittiness of life can suck the life out of me! I know where to get an infusion of joy and hope–sometimes it’s just luxuriating in my own garden. Now a beach walk is a sure thing any time. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Debra,
      It’s good to see that there are some out there that know and practice what this post is about. Yes, beauty is around us and very abundant! Love how you use it as a respite from the grittiness of life. Well stated!

      Like

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